Cable grafting of the spinal accessory nerve after radical neck dissection

Edward C. Weisberger, John Kincaid, Jeanne Riteris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: From January 1981 through March 1996, 20 patients with head and neck cancer underwent radical neck dissection with sacrifice of the spinal accessory nerve and immediate reconstruction of the nerve using a microsurgical technique and a cable graft of the great auricular nerve. Methods: Postoperative shoulder function was assessed via a subjective questionnaire, objective strength testing, and/or postoperative electromyography. The latter was used to evaluate for the presence and amplitude of voluntary motor potentials, the presence of fibrillation potentials, and nerve conduction latency. The group of patients who underwent cable grafting of the spinal accessory nerve was compared with a group of patients who underwent modified radical neck dissection with preservation of the spinal accessory nerve and with another group of patients who underwent a classic neck dissection with sacrifice of the spinal accessory nerve and no reconstruction. Results: In terms of shoulder function, the group of patients in whom the spinal accessory nerve was reconstructed occupied an intermediate position; ie, their postoperative shoulder function was better than that of the patients who underwent radical neck dissection without reconstruction but not as good as that of the patients who underwent modified neck dissection with preservation of the spinal accessory nerve. Conclusion: Cable grafting of the spinal accessory nerve that has been sacrificed during radical neck dissection results in improved shoulder function in the postoperative period.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)377-380
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Volume124
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 1998

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Accessory Nerve
Neck Dissection
Neural Conduction
Electromyography
Head and Neck Neoplasms
Postoperative Period
Transplants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Cable grafting of the spinal accessory nerve after radical neck dissection. / Weisberger, Edward C.; Kincaid, John; Riteris, Jeanne.

In: Archives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Vol. 124, No. 4, 04.1998, p. 377-380.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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