Caffeine intake, coffee consumption, and risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma

Shaowei Wu, Jiali Han, Fengju Song, Eunyoung Cho, Xiang Gao, David J. Hunter, Abrar A. Qureshi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Caffeine has been shown to prevent ultraviolet radiation- induced carcinogenesis and to inhibit growth of melanoma cells in experimental studies. We evaluated the association among caffeine intake, coffee consumption, and melanoma risk among three large cohort studies. Methods: The analysis used data from 89,220 women in the Nurses' Health Study II (1991-2009), 74,666 women in the Nurses' Health Study (1980-2008), and 39,424 men in the Health Professionals Follow- up Study (1986-2008). We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate the hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of melanoma associated with dietary intakes. Results: We documented 2,254 melanoma cases over 4 million person-years of follow-up. After adjustment for other risk factors, higher total caffeine intake was associated with a lower risk of melanoma (=393 mg/day vs. <60 mg/day: HR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.64, 0.96; Ptrend = 0.048). The association was more apparent in women (=393 mg/day vs. <60 mg/day: HR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.58, 0.85; Ptrend = 0.001) than in men (HR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.75, 1.2; Ptrend = 0.81), and more apparent for melanomas occurring on body sites with higher continuous sun exposure (head, neck, and extremities; =393 mg/day vs. <60 mg/day: HR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.59, 0.86; Ptrend = 0.001) than for melanomas occurring on body sites with lower continuous sun exposure (trunk including shoulder, back, hip abdomen, and chest; HR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.70, 1.2; Ptrend = 0.60). This pattern of association was similar to that for caffeinated coffee consumption, whereas no association was found for decaffeinated coffee consumption and melanoma risk. Conclusions: Increasing caffeine intake and caffeinated coffee consumption is associated with decreased risk of cutaneous malignant melanomas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)898-908
Number of pages11
JournalEpidemiology
Volume26
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

Fingerprint

Coffee
Caffeine
Melanoma
Confidence Intervals
Solar System
Nurses
Men's Health
Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma
Health
Proportional Hazards Models
Abdomen
Hip
Carcinogenesis
Cohort Studies
Neck
Thorax
Extremities
Head
Radiation
Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Wu, S., Han, J., Song, F., Cho, E., Gao, X., Hunter, D. J., & Qureshi, A. A. (2015). Caffeine intake, coffee consumption, and risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma. Epidemiology, 26(6), 898-908. https://doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0000000000000360

Caffeine intake, coffee consumption, and risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma. / Wu, Shaowei; Han, Jiali; Song, Fengju; Cho, Eunyoung; Gao, Xiang; Hunter, David J.; Qureshi, Abrar A.

In: Epidemiology, Vol. 26, No. 6, 01.10.2015, p. 898-908.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wu, S, Han, J, Song, F, Cho, E, Gao, X, Hunter, DJ & Qureshi, AA 2015, 'Caffeine intake, coffee consumption, and risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma', Epidemiology, vol. 26, no. 6, pp. 898-908. https://doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0000000000000360
Wu, Shaowei ; Han, Jiali ; Song, Fengju ; Cho, Eunyoung ; Gao, Xiang ; Hunter, David J. ; Qureshi, Abrar A. / Caffeine intake, coffee consumption, and risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma. In: Epidemiology. 2015 ; Vol. 26, No. 6. pp. 898-908.
@article{f6da2332d5044ae7b83908d0c6c28e30,
title = "Caffeine intake, coffee consumption, and risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma",
abstract = "Background: Caffeine has been shown to prevent ultraviolet radiation- induced carcinogenesis and to inhibit growth of melanoma cells in experimental studies. We evaluated the association among caffeine intake, coffee consumption, and melanoma risk among three large cohort studies. Methods: The analysis used data from 89,220 women in the Nurses' Health Study II (1991-2009), 74,666 women in the Nurses' Health Study (1980-2008), and 39,424 men in the Health Professionals Follow- up Study (1986-2008). We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate the hazard ratios (HR) with 95{\%} confidence intervals (CIs) of melanoma associated with dietary intakes. Results: We documented 2,254 melanoma cases over 4 million person-years of follow-up. After adjustment for other risk factors, higher total caffeine intake was associated with a lower risk of melanoma (=393 mg/day vs. <60 mg/day: HR = 0.78, 95{\%} CI = 0.64, 0.96; Ptrend = 0.048). The association was more apparent in women (=393 mg/day vs. <60 mg/day: HR = 0.70, 95{\%} CI = 0.58, 0.85; Ptrend = 0.001) than in men (HR = 0.94, 95{\%} CI = 0.75, 1.2; Ptrend = 0.81), and more apparent for melanomas occurring on body sites with higher continuous sun exposure (head, neck, and extremities; =393 mg/day vs. <60 mg/day: HR = 0.71, 95{\%} CI = 0.59, 0.86; Ptrend = 0.001) than for melanomas occurring on body sites with lower continuous sun exposure (trunk including shoulder, back, hip abdomen, and chest; HR = 0.90, 95{\%} CI = 0.70, 1.2; Ptrend = 0.60). This pattern of association was similar to that for caffeinated coffee consumption, whereas no association was found for decaffeinated coffee consumption and melanoma risk. Conclusions: Increasing caffeine intake and caffeinated coffee consumption is associated with decreased risk of cutaneous malignant melanomas.",
author = "Shaowei Wu and Jiali Han and Fengju Song and Eunyoung Cho and Xiang Gao and Hunter, {David J.} and Qureshi, {Abrar A.}",
year = "2015",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/EDE.0000000000000360",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "26",
pages = "898--908",
journal = "Epidemiology",
issn = "1044-3983",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Caffeine intake, coffee consumption, and risk of cutaneous malignant melanoma

AU - Wu, Shaowei

AU - Han, Jiali

AU - Song, Fengju

AU - Cho, Eunyoung

AU - Gao, Xiang

AU - Hunter, David J.

AU - Qureshi, Abrar A.

PY - 2015/10/1

Y1 - 2015/10/1

N2 - Background: Caffeine has been shown to prevent ultraviolet radiation- induced carcinogenesis and to inhibit growth of melanoma cells in experimental studies. We evaluated the association among caffeine intake, coffee consumption, and melanoma risk among three large cohort studies. Methods: The analysis used data from 89,220 women in the Nurses' Health Study II (1991-2009), 74,666 women in the Nurses' Health Study (1980-2008), and 39,424 men in the Health Professionals Follow- up Study (1986-2008). We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate the hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of melanoma associated with dietary intakes. Results: We documented 2,254 melanoma cases over 4 million person-years of follow-up. After adjustment for other risk factors, higher total caffeine intake was associated with a lower risk of melanoma (=393 mg/day vs. <60 mg/day: HR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.64, 0.96; Ptrend = 0.048). The association was more apparent in women (=393 mg/day vs. <60 mg/day: HR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.58, 0.85; Ptrend = 0.001) than in men (HR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.75, 1.2; Ptrend = 0.81), and more apparent for melanomas occurring on body sites with higher continuous sun exposure (head, neck, and extremities; =393 mg/day vs. <60 mg/day: HR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.59, 0.86; Ptrend = 0.001) than for melanomas occurring on body sites with lower continuous sun exposure (trunk including shoulder, back, hip abdomen, and chest; HR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.70, 1.2; Ptrend = 0.60). This pattern of association was similar to that for caffeinated coffee consumption, whereas no association was found for decaffeinated coffee consumption and melanoma risk. Conclusions: Increasing caffeine intake and caffeinated coffee consumption is associated with decreased risk of cutaneous malignant melanomas.

AB - Background: Caffeine has been shown to prevent ultraviolet radiation- induced carcinogenesis and to inhibit growth of melanoma cells in experimental studies. We evaluated the association among caffeine intake, coffee consumption, and melanoma risk among three large cohort studies. Methods: The analysis used data from 89,220 women in the Nurses' Health Study II (1991-2009), 74,666 women in the Nurses' Health Study (1980-2008), and 39,424 men in the Health Professionals Follow- up Study (1986-2008). We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate the hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of melanoma associated with dietary intakes. Results: We documented 2,254 melanoma cases over 4 million person-years of follow-up. After adjustment for other risk factors, higher total caffeine intake was associated with a lower risk of melanoma (=393 mg/day vs. <60 mg/day: HR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.64, 0.96; Ptrend = 0.048). The association was more apparent in women (=393 mg/day vs. <60 mg/day: HR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.58, 0.85; Ptrend = 0.001) than in men (HR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.75, 1.2; Ptrend = 0.81), and more apparent for melanomas occurring on body sites with higher continuous sun exposure (head, neck, and extremities; =393 mg/day vs. <60 mg/day: HR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.59, 0.86; Ptrend = 0.001) than for melanomas occurring on body sites with lower continuous sun exposure (trunk including shoulder, back, hip abdomen, and chest; HR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.70, 1.2; Ptrend = 0.60). This pattern of association was similar to that for caffeinated coffee consumption, whereas no association was found for decaffeinated coffee consumption and melanoma risk. Conclusions: Increasing caffeine intake and caffeinated coffee consumption is associated with decreased risk of cutaneous malignant melanomas.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84942786065&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84942786065&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/EDE.0000000000000360

DO - 10.1097/EDE.0000000000000360

M3 - Article

VL - 26

SP - 898

EP - 908

JO - Epidemiology

JF - Epidemiology

SN - 1044-3983

IS - 6

ER -