Calcium

Connie M. Weaver, Munro Peacock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Calcium is the fifth most abundant element in the body with >99% residing in the skeleton as hydroxyapatite, a complex calcium phosphate molecule. This mineral supplies the strength to bones that support locomotion, but it also serves as a reservoir to maintain serum calcium concentrations. Calcium plays a central role in a wide range of essential functions. Its metabolism is regulated by 3 major transport systems: intestinal absorption, renal reabsorption, and bone turnover. Calcium transport in these tissues is regulated by a sophisticated homeostatic hormonal system that involves parathyroid hormone, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in response to decreased serum ionized calcium, detected by the calcium-sensing receptor (1).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)546-548
Number of pages3
JournalAdvances in nutrition (Bethesda, Md.)
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019

Fingerprint

Calcium
calcium
Calcium-Sensing Receptors
bones
Bone Remodeling
Intestinal Absorption
Durapatite
Locomotion
hydroxyapatite
Parathyroid Hormone
Serum
parathyroid hormone
Skeleton
calcium phosphates
intestinal absorption
Minerals
locomotion
skeleton
Bone and Bones
kidneys

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Calcium. / Weaver, Connie M.; Peacock, Munro.

In: Advances in nutrition (Bethesda, Md.), Vol. 10, No. 3, 01.05.2019, p. 546-548.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weaver, Connie M. ; Peacock, Munro. / Calcium. In: Advances in nutrition (Bethesda, Md.). 2019 ; Vol. 10, No. 3. pp. 546-548.
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