Calcium absorption efficiency and calcium requirements in children and adolescents

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Optimizing bone mass of young adults is important in the prevention of osteoporosis in later life. To achieve maximal peak bone mass, dietary calcium and its absorption need to be sufficient for skeletal growth and consolidation and for obligatory losses in urine, feces, and sweat. Direct measurements of skeletal accretion, obligatory losses, and of dietary calcium and absorption in children and adolescents have either not been done or are incomplete. From the measurements available and from extrapolated data in adults, it appears likely that many children and adolescents are not absorbing sufficient calcium in relation to their intake to achieve maximal bone mass.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume54
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
StatePublished - Jul 1991

Fingerprint

Dietary Calcium
bones
Calcium
calcium
Bone and Bones
sweat
Sweat
osteoporosis
young adults
Feces
Osteoporosis
Young Adult
urine
feces
Urine
Growth

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Calcium absorption
  • Children
  • Dietary calcium
  • Endogenous fecal calcium
  • Skeletal calcium accretion
  • Sweat calcium
  • Urine calcium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Calcium absorption efficiency and calcium requirements in children and adolescents. / Peacock, Munro.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 54, No. SUPPL. 1, 07.1991.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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