Calcium builds strong bones, and more is better-correct? Well, maybe not

Sophie A. Jamal, Sharon Moe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Calcium supplementation has been considered the gold standard therapy for osteoporosis in the general population. It is given in both the placebo and treatment groups of trials evaluating antifracture efficacy of new therapies. Similarly, calcium-based phosphate binders have been considered the gold standard comparator for all new phosphate binders. However, large randomized trials demonstrate conflicting data on the antifracture efficacy of calcium supplementation, particularly in high doses, in patients with osteoporosis without CKD. In addition, recent data suggest an increased risk for cardiovascular events. These new studies raise safety concerns for the general approach with calcium supplementation and binders. This review describes recent data on the adverse effects of calcium supplementation for osteoporosis and howthese new data should affect the strategy for phosphate binder use in CKD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1877-1883
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology
Volume7
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 7 2012

Fingerprint

Osteoporosis
Calcium
Bone and Bones
Phosphates
Therapeutics
Placebos
Safety
Population
calcium phosphate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology
  • Transplantation
  • Epidemiology
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Calcium builds strong bones, and more is better-correct? Well, maybe not. / Jamal, Sophie A.; Moe, Sharon.

In: Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, Vol. 7, No. 11, 07.11.2012, p. 1877-1883.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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