Calcium oxalate calculi found attached to the renal papilla: Preliminary evidence for early mechanisms in stone formation

James C. Williams, Brian R. Matlaga, Samuel C. Kim, Molly E. Jackson, André J. Sommer, James A. McAteer, James E. Lingeman, Andrew P. Evan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Calculi are commonly found attached to the renal papilla in calcium oxalate (CaOx) stone formers, but the mechanisms by which stones form in this manner are not well established. Materials and Methods: Data are presented from three attached stones collected from different patients. Stone morphology and composition were determined using micro computed tomography (CT) and infrared microspectrometry. Results: One of the stones was composed of CaOx with a peripheral region of apatite, such as might have come from a Randall's plaque. Another stone was covered with large CaOx crystals but contained at least two layers of apatite, with no apatite regions exposed at the surface. The third stone contained CaOx with inclusions of apatite and more apatite on its surface, along with a substantial volume of poorly mineralized material that could not be identified. Conclusions: The complexity of these stones and their differing morphologies do not by themselves allow inference of the mechanism of stone formation. Future work will require the careful documentation of attached stones on the papilla, as well as study of the papilla after the stone has been removed, before it can be determined whether such diverse CaOx stones originate from the same or different underlying etiologies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)885-890
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Endourology
Volume20
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2006

Fingerprint

Apatites
Calcium Oxalate
Calculi
Kidney
Documentation
Tomography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Calcium oxalate calculi found attached to the renal papilla : Preliminary evidence for early mechanisms in stone formation. / Williams, James C.; Matlaga, Brian R.; Kim, Samuel C.; Jackson, Molly E.; Sommer, André J.; McAteer, James A.; Lingeman, James E.; Evan, Andrew P.

In: Journal of Endourology, Vol. 20, No. 11, 01.11.2006, p. 885-890.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Williams, James C. ; Matlaga, Brian R. ; Kim, Samuel C. ; Jackson, Molly E. ; Sommer, André J. ; McAteer, James A. ; Lingeman, James E. ; Evan, Andrew P. / Calcium oxalate calculi found attached to the renal papilla : Preliminary evidence for early mechanisms in stone formation. In: Journal of Endourology. 2006 ; Vol. 20, No. 11. pp. 885-890.
@article{ab7924acf9174661b2d7c7435e7c2e35,
title = "Calcium oxalate calculi found attached to the renal papilla: Preliminary evidence for early mechanisms in stone formation",
abstract = "Background: Calculi are commonly found attached to the renal papilla in calcium oxalate (CaOx) stone formers, but the mechanisms by which stones form in this manner are not well established. Materials and Methods: Data are presented from three attached stones collected from different patients. Stone morphology and composition were determined using micro computed tomography (CT) and infrared microspectrometry. Results: One of the stones was composed of CaOx with a peripheral region of apatite, such as might have come from a Randall's plaque. Another stone was covered with large CaOx crystals but contained at least two layers of apatite, with no apatite regions exposed at the surface. The third stone contained CaOx with inclusions of apatite and more apatite on its surface, along with a substantial volume of poorly mineralized material that could not be identified. Conclusions: The complexity of these stones and their differing morphologies do not by themselves allow inference of the mechanism of stone formation. Future work will require the careful documentation of attached stones on the papilla, as well as study of the papilla after the stone has been removed, before it can be determined whether such diverse CaOx stones originate from the same or different underlying etiologies.",
author = "Williams, {James C.} and Matlaga, {Brian R.} and Kim, {Samuel C.} and Jackson, {Molly E.} and Sommer, {Andr{\'e} J.} and McAteer, {James A.} and Lingeman, {James E.} and Evan, {Andrew P.}",
year = "2006",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1089/end.2006.20.885",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "20",
pages = "885--890",
journal = "Journal of Endourology",
issn = "0892-7790",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Calcium oxalate calculi found attached to the renal papilla

T2 - Preliminary evidence for early mechanisms in stone formation

AU - Williams, James C.

AU - Matlaga, Brian R.

AU - Kim, Samuel C.

AU - Jackson, Molly E.

AU - Sommer, André J.

AU - McAteer, James A.

AU - Lingeman, James E.

AU - Evan, Andrew P.

PY - 2006/11/1

Y1 - 2006/11/1

N2 - Background: Calculi are commonly found attached to the renal papilla in calcium oxalate (CaOx) stone formers, but the mechanisms by which stones form in this manner are not well established. Materials and Methods: Data are presented from three attached stones collected from different patients. Stone morphology and composition were determined using micro computed tomography (CT) and infrared microspectrometry. Results: One of the stones was composed of CaOx with a peripheral region of apatite, such as might have come from a Randall's plaque. Another stone was covered with large CaOx crystals but contained at least two layers of apatite, with no apatite regions exposed at the surface. The third stone contained CaOx with inclusions of apatite and more apatite on its surface, along with a substantial volume of poorly mineralized material that could not be identified. Conclusions: The complexity of these stones and their differing morphologies do not by themselves allow inference of the mechanism of stone formation. Future work will require the careful documentation of attached stones on the papilla, as well as study of the papilla after the stone has been removed, before it can be determined whether such diverse CaOx stones originate from the same or different underlying etiologies.

AB - Background: Calculi are commonly found attached to the renal papilla in calcium oxalate (CaOx) stone formers, but the mechanisms by which stones form in this manner are not well established. Materials and Methods: Data are presented from three attached stones collected from different patients. Stone morphology and composition were determined using micro computed tomography (CT) and infrared microspectrometry. Results: One of the stones was composed of CaOx with a peripheral region of apatite, such as might have come from a Randall's plaque. Another stone was covered with large CaOx crystals but contained at least two layers of apatite, with no apatite regions exposed at the surface. The third stone contained CaOx with inclusions of apatite and more apatite on its surface, along with a substantial volume of poorly mineralized material that could not be identified. Conclusions: The complexity of these stones and their differing morphologies do not by themselves allow inference of the mechanism of stone formation. Future work will require the careful documentation of attached stones on the papilla, as well as study of the papilla after the stone has been removed, before it can be determined whether such diverse CaOx stones originate from the same or different underlying etiologies.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33845403434&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33845403434&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1089/end.2006.20.885

DO - 10.1089/end.2006.20.885

M3 - Article

C2 - 17144856

AN - SCOPUS:33845403434

VL - 20

SP - 885

EP - 890

JO - Journal of Endourology

JF - Journal of Endourology

SN - 0892-7790

IS - 11

ER -