Can deterministic mechanical size effects contribute to fracture and microdamage accumulation in trabecular bone?

Thomas Siegmund, Matthew Allen, David Burr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Failure of bone under monotonic and cyclic loading is related to the bone mineral density, the quality of the bone matrix, and the evolution of microcracks. The theory of linear elastic fracture mechanics has commonly been applied to describe fracture in bone. Evidence is presented that bone failure can be described through a non-linear theory of fracture. Thereby, deterministic size effects are introduced. Concepts of a non-linear theory are applied to discern how the interaction among bone matrix constituents (collagen and mineral), microcrack characteristics, and trabecular architecture can create distinctively differences in the fracture resistance at the bone tissue level. The non-linear model is applied to interpret pre-clinical data concerning the effects of anti-osteoporotic agents on bone properties. The results show that bisphosphonate (BP) treatments that suppress bone remodeling will change trabecular bone in ways such that the size of the failure process zone relative to the trabecular thickness is reduced. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) that suppress bone remodeling will change trabecular bone in ways such that the size of the failure process zone relative to the trabecular thickness is increased. The consequences of these changes are reflected in bone mechanical response and predictions are consistent with experimental observations in the animal model which show that BP treatment is associated with more brittle fracture and microcracks without altering the average length of the cracks, whereas SERM treatments lead to a more ductile fracture and mainly increase crack length with a smaller increase in microcrack density. The model suggests that BPs may be more effective in cases in which bone mass is very low, whereas SERMS may be more effective when milder osteoporotic symptoms are present.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)202-210
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Theoretical Biology
Volume265
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2010

Fingerprint

Size Effect
Bone
bones
Bone and Bones
Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators
Bone Matrix
Microcracks
Bone Remodeling
Diphosphonates
Estrogen Receptor
Nonlinear Dynamics
Bone Fractures
Modulator
Mechanics
Bone Density
Minerals
Cancellous Bone
Crack
Collagen
Modulators

Keywords

  • Biomechanics
  • Fatigue
  • Fracture
  • Microdamage
  • Size effect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Statistics and Probability
  • Applied Mathematics

Cite this

Can deterministic mechanical size effects contribute to fracture and microdamage accumulation in trabecular bone? / Siegmund, Thomas; Allen, Matthew; Burr, David.

In: Journal of Theoretical Biology, Vol. 265, No. 2, 07.2010, p. 202-210.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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