Can genital-tract human papillomavirus infection and cervical cancer be prevented with a vaccine?

Joakim Dillner, Darron Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the cause of squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix. This causative relationship has provided the rationale and incentive for development of a prophylactic vaccine. Such a vaccine, if found to be effective, could reduce the need for cervical cancer screening and have a profound effect on the incidence of cervical and other anogenital cancers. This review begins by examining the basic biological and epidemiological principles relevant to the development of HPV preventative vaccines. It then summarises studies examining the use of vaccines to prevent HPV infection in animals and humans, and, finally, discusses some of the unanswered issues surrounding vaccine development against HPV infection and cervical cancer.

Original languageEnglish
JournalExpert Reviews in Molecular Medicine
Volume6
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2004

Fingerprint

Papillomavirus Infections
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Vaccines
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Human Development
Early Detection of Cancer
Cervix Uteri
Motivation
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Screening
Animals
Incidence
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Cervical cancer
  • HPV
  • Human papillomavirus
  • Vaccine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)
  • Molecular Medicine

Cite this

Can genital-tract human papillomavirus infection and cervical cancer be prevented with a vaccine? / Dillner, Joakim; Brown, Darron.

In: Expert Reviews in Molecular Medicine, Vol. 6, No. 9, 04.2004.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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