Can self-prediction overcome barriers to hepatitis b vaccination? A randomized controlled trial

Anthony D. Cox, Dena Cox, Rosalie Cyrier, Yolanda Graham-Dotson, Gregory Zimet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a serious public health problem, due in part to low vaccination rates among high-risk adults, many of whom decline vaccination because of barriers such as perceived inconvenience or discomfort. This study evaluates the efficacy of a self-prediction intervention to increase HBV vaccination rates among high-risk adults. Method: Randomized controlled trial of 1,175 adults recruited from three sexually transmitted disease clinics in the United States over 28 months. Participants completed an audio-computer-assisted self-interview, which presented information about HBV infection and vaccination, and measured relevant beliefs, behaviors, and demographics. Half of participants were assigned randomly to a "self-prediction" intervention, asking them to predict their future acceptance of HBV vaccination. The main outcome measure was subsequent vaccination behavior. Other measures included perceived barriers to HBV vaccination, measured prior to the intervention. Results: There was a significant interaction between the intervention and vaccination barriers, indicating the effect of the intervention differed depending on perceived vaccination barriers. Among high-barriers patients, the intervention significantly increased vaccination acceptance. Among low-barriers patients, the intervention did not influence vaccination acceptance. Conclusions: The self-prediction intervention significantly increased vaccination acceptance among "high-barriers" patients, who typically have very low vaccination rates. This brief intervention could be a useful tool in increasing vaccine uptake among high-barriers patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)97-105
Number of pages9
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2012

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Hepatitis
Vaccination
Randomized Controlled Trials
Hepatitis B virus
Virus Diseases
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Vaccines
Public Health
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Interviews

Keywords

  • HBV vaccination
  • Mere measurement
  • Self-prediction
  • Temporal construal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Applied Psychology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Can self-prediction overcome barriers to hepatitis b vaccination? A randomized controlled trial. / Cox, Anthony D.; Cox, Dena; Cyrier, Rosalie; Graham-Dotson, Yolanda; Zimet, Gregory.

In: Health Psychology, Vol. 31, No. 1, 01.2012, p. 97-105.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cox, Anthony D. ; Cox, Dena ; Cyrier, Rosalie ; Graham-Dotson, Yolanda ; Zimet, Gregory. / Can self-prediction overcome barriers to hepatitis b vaccination? A randomized controlled trial. In: Health Psychology. 2012 ; Vol. 31, No. 1. pp. 97-105.
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