Can teaching agenda-setting skills to physicians improve clinical interaction quality? A controlled intervention

Hector P. Rodriguez, Michael P. Anastario, Richard Frankel, Esosa G. Odigie, William H. Rogers, Ted Von Glahn, Dana G. Safran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Physicians and medical educators have repeatedly acknowledged the inadequacy of communication skills training in the medical school curriculum and opportunities to improve these skills in practice. This study of a controlled intervention evaluates the effect of teaching practicing physicians the skill of "agenda-setting" on patients' experiences with care. The agenda-setting intervention aimed to engage clinicians in the practice of initiating patient encounters by eliciting the full set of concerns from the patient's perspective and using that information to prioritize and negotiate which clinical issues should most appropriately be dealt with and which (if any) should be deferred to a subsequent visit. Methods. Ten physicians from a large physician organization in California with baseline patient survey scores below the statewide 25th percentile participated in the agenda-setting intervention. Eleven physicians matched on baseline scores, geography, specialty, and practice size were selected as controls. Changes in survey summary scores from pre- and post-intervention surveys were compared between the two groups. Multilevel regression models that accounted for the clustering of patients within physicians and controlled for respondent characteristics were used to examine the effect of the intervention on survey scale scores. Results. There was statistically significant improvement in intervention physicians' ability to "explain things in a way that was easy to understand" (p = 0.02) and marginally significant improvement in the overall quality of physician-patient interactions (p = 0.08) compared to control group physicians. Changes in patients' experiences with organizational access, care coordination, and office staff interactions did not differ by experimental group. Conclusion. A simple and modest behavioral training for practicing physicians has potential to positively affect physician-patient relationship interaction quality. It will be important to evaluate the effect of more extensive trainings, including those that work with physicians on a broader set of communication techniques.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3
JournalBMC Medical Education
Volume8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

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Teaching
physician
Physicians
interaction
behavioral training
Communication
physician-patient relationship
Physician-Patient Relations
Geography
Aptitude
Group
Medical Schools
communication skills
Curriculum
Cluster Analysis
experience
Surveys and Questionnaires
educator
geography
staff

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Can teaching agenda-setting skills to physicians improve clinical interaction quality? A controlled intervention. / Rodriguez, Hector P.; Anastario, Michael P.; Frankel, Richard; Odigie, Esosa G.; Rogers, William H.; Von Glahn, Ted; Safran, Dana G.

In: BMC Medical Education, Vol. 8, 3, 2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rodriguez, Hector P. ; Anastario, Michael P. ; Frankel, Richard ; Odigie, Esosa G. ; Rogers, William H. ; Von Glahn, Ted ; Safran, Dana G. / Can teaching agenda-setting skills to physicians improve clinical interaction quality? A controlled intervention. In: BMC Medical Education. 2008 ; Vol. 8.
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