Cancer-associated bone disease

Sue A. Brown, Theresa Guise

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Patients with cancer are at risk for many events involving the skeleton, including metastatic disease of bone and treatment-related bone loss. Cancer-related therapies that can affect bone include hormonal therapy, chemotherapy, and the use of glucocorticoids. Screening for bone loss, with lifestyle modifications and the early use of anti-osteoporosis therapies such as bisphosphonates, may decrease bone loss and reduce the risk of fracture. This article reviews risk factors and mechanisms associated with cancer-related bone loss and metastases as well as strategies for the detection of bone-related complications of cancer and therapies to treat these complications. This article focuses on the more common cancers with adverse skeletal effects: breast cancer, prostate cancer, and multiple myeloma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)120-127
Number of pages8
JournalCurrent Osteoporosis Reports
Volume5
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Bone Neoplasms
Bone Diseases
Bone and Bones
Second Primary Neoplasms
Prostatic Neoplasms
Diphosphonates
Multiple Myeloma
Skeleton
Glucocorticoids
Osteoporosis
Life Style
Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasm Metastasis
Drug Therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Cancer-associated bone disease. / Brown, Sue A.; Guise, Theresa.

In: Current Osteoporosis Reports, Vol. 5, No. 3, 09.2007, p. 120-127.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brown, SA & Guise, T 2007, 'Cancer-associated bone disease', Current Osteoporosis Reports, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 120-127.
Brown, Sue A. ; Guise, Theresa. / Cancer-associated bone disease. In: Current Osteoporosis Reports. 2007 ; Vol. 5, No. 3. pp. 120-127.
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