Cancer-related fatigue and its associations with depression and anxiety: A systematic review

Linda F. Brown, Kurt Kroenke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

168 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Fatigue is an important symptom in cancer and has been shown to be associated with psychological distress. Objective: This review assesses evidence regarding associations of cancer-related fatigue with depression and anxiety. Method: Database searches yielded 59 studies reporting correlation coefficients or odds ratios. Results: The combined sample size was 12,103. Almost all studies showed a correlation of fatigue with depression and with anxiety. However, 31 different instruments were used to assess fatigue, suggesting a lack of consensus on measurement. Conclusion: This review confirms the association of fatigue with depression and anxiety. Directionality needs to be better delineated in longitudinal studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)440-447
Number of pages8
JournalPsychosomatics
Volume50
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2009

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Fatigue
Anxiety
Depression
Neoplasms
Sample Size
Longitudinal Studies
Consensus
Odds Ratio
Cancer
Systematic Review
Databases
Psychology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Cancer-related fatigue and its associations with depression and anxiety : A systematic review. / Brown, Linda F.; Kroenke, Kurt.

In: Psychosomatics, Vol. 50, No. 5, 09.2009, p. 440-447.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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