Cannabis users differ from non-users on measures of personality and schizotypy

Daniel J. Fridberg, Jennifer M. Vollmer, Brian F. O'Donnell, Patrick D. Skosnik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Scopus citations

Abstract

Accumulating evidence indicates that cannabis use may be a risk factor for schizophrenia (SZ), and chronic cannabis users score higher than non-users on measures of schizotypal personality traits. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relations between normal personality, schizotypy, and cannabis use. Sixty-two chronic cannabis users and 45 cannabis-naïve controls completed a measure of normal personality, the NEO-Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI), and two measures of schizotypy, the schizotypal personality questionnaire (SPQ) and perceptual aberration scale (PAS). Substance use was assessed using the SCID I alcohol/drug module and a locally developed drug use questionnaire. On the NEO-FFI, users scored higher than controls on openness, but lower on agreeableness and conscientiousness, and endorsed greater schizotypy on the SPQ and PAS. Higher neuroticism predicted greater schizotypy in both groups, and, higher Extraversion predicted lower negative-syndrome schizotypy among users. Finally, duration of cannabis use was positively correlated with scores on the SPQ and PAS among users, suggesting a relation between overall cannabis use chronicity and schizotypy. These data show that cannabis users differ from non-users on dimensions of normal personality and schizotypy, and provide further evidence that cannabis use is associated with increased levels of psychosis-related personality traits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)46-52
Number of pages7
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume186
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 30 2011

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Keywords

  • Five-factor model
  • Marijuana
  • Perceptual aberration scale
  • Schizophrenia
  • Schizotypal personality questionnaire

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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