Care of diabetic pregnant women by primary-care physicians: Reported strategies for managing pregestational and gestational diabetes

David G. Marrero, Patricia Moore, Carl D. Langefeld, Alan Golichowski, Charles M. Clark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - To ascertain the strategies used by primary-care physicians for treating pregestational and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) during pregnancy, because many women with pregnancies complicated by these types of diabetes are treated by physicians who have no special training in intensive diabetes management. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Two hundred twenty-four family-practice (FP) physicians and 184 obstetrics/gynecology (OB/GYN) physicians were surveyed by mail. RESULTS - When compared with OB/GYNs, FPs were less likely to screen all pregnant women for GDM (P = 0.03), use multiple-injection insulin regimens (P = 0.004) or self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) (P = 0.01) for Pre-GDM patients, and refer these patients to a specialist for medical (P = 0.01) or ophthalmologic (P < 0.001) care. FPs were more likely to implement insulin therapy (P = 0.003), SMBG (P = 0.02), and examine eyes for retinopathy (P < 0.001) when treating gestational patients. CONCLUSIONS - These data show that there are considerable discrepancies between the strategies used by FPs and OB/GYNs and also suggest that physicians in both groups are under-utilizing recommended treatment strategies described in publications targeted specifically to primary-care physicians. Increased exposure to and dissemination of guidelines for diabetes management and additional medical school and postgraduate education programs are recommended as methods to improve utilization of these strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)101-107
Number of pages7
JournalDiabetes care
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1992

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

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