Caregiver rating of provider participatory decision-making style and caregiver and child satisfaction with pediatric asthma visits

Betsy Sleath, Guadalupe X. Ayala, Deidre Washington, Stephanie Davis, Dennis Williams, Gail Tudor, Karin Yeatts, Chris Gillette

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between caregiver ratings of provider use of a participatory decision-making style and caregiver and child satisfaction with their pediatric asthma visits. Methods: Children ages 8 through 16 with persistent asthma and their caregivers were recruited at five pediatric practices. Children were interviewed and caregivers completed questionnaires after their child's medical visits. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyze the data. Results: Three hundred and twenty children were recruited. Caregivers were significantly more satisfied with providers who they perceived as using more of a participatory decision-making style (beta = 17.80, p<0.001). Children (beta = -0.10, p<0.05) and caregivers (beta = -0.21, p<0.01) were significantly more satisfied with younger providers. Children were significantly more satisfied with providers who knew them better as a person (beta = 2.87, p<0.001). Conclusions: Caregivers were more satisfied with providers who they perceived as involving them more during treatment decisions made during pediatric asthma visits. Practice implications: Providers should attempt to use a more participatory decision-making style with families during pediatric asthma visits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)286-289
Number of pages4
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
Volume85
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Caregivers
Decision Making
Asthma
Pediatrics

Keywords

  • Asthma
  • Health care providers
  • Participatory decision-making style
  • Pediatrics
  • Satisfaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Caregiver rating of provider participatory decision-making style and caregiver and child satisfaction with pediatric asthma visits. / Sleath, Betsy; Ayala, Guadalupe X.; Washington, Deidre; Davis, Stephanie; Williams, Dennis; Tudor, Gail; Yeatts, Karin; Gillette, Chris.

In: Patient Education and Counseling, Vol. 85, No. 2, 11.2011, p. 286-289.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sleath, Betsy ; Ayala, Guadalupe X. ; Washington, Deidre ; Davis, Stephanie ; Williams, Dennis ; Tudor, Gail ; Yeatts, Karin ; Gillette, Chris. / Caregiver rating of provider participatory decision-making style and caregiver and child satisfaction with pediatric asthma visits. In: Patient Education and Counseling. 2011 ; Vol. 85, No. 2. pp. 286-289.
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