Carotid body tumors, inheritance, and a high incidence of associated cervical paragangliomas

Phillip Gardner, Michael Dalsing, Edward Weisberger, Alan Sawchuk, Richard Miyamoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Current experience with carotid body tumors suggesting a high prevalence of associated cervical paragangliomas prompted this review. PATIENTS AND METHODS: An 8-year retrospective study of patients with carotid body tumors was undertaken, detailing presentation, diagnosis, and treatment. RESULTS: Eleven patients harboring 17 carotid body tumors were discovered. All patients had a neck mass. Seven patients (64%) had bilateral carotid body tumors. Six (55%) reported a positive family history-4 were first-generation relatives, 5 had bilateral tumors, and 3 had other head and neck paragangliomas. Angiography documented 4 associated vagal and 2 glomus jugulare paragangliomas in addition to the carotid body tumors. Precise surgical care limited blood loss to an average of 590 cc. The carotid artery was repaired during 5 resections (29%). Cranial nerve injury occurred in 3 cases, all following vagal body or glomus jugulare resection. Every patient is currently alive, stroke free, and functioning without major disability. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with carotid body tumors have a propensity for multiple head and neck paragangliomas. Angiography is diagnostic. The need for associated paraganglioma resection dramatically increases the risk of cranial nerve injury.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)196-199
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume172
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1996

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Carotid Body Tumor
Paraganglioma
Glomus Jugulare
Incidence
Cranial Nerve Injuries
Neck
Angiography
Aortic Bodies
Head
Carotid Arteries
Retrospective Studies
Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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Carotid body tumors, inheritance, and a high incidence of associated cervical paragangliomas. / Gardner, Phillip; Dalsing, Michael; Weisberger, Edward; Sawchuk, Alan; Miyamoto, Richard.

In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 172, No. 2, 08.1996, p. 196-199.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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