Cell Phone Information Seeking Explains Blood Pressure in African American Women

Lenette M. Jones, Tiffany C. Veinot, Susan Pressler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although cell phone use and Internet access via cell phone is not marked by racial disparities, little is known about how cell phone use relates to blood pressure and health information seeking behaviors. The purposes of this study were to (a) describe Internet activities, cell phone use, and information seeking; (b) determine differences in blood pressure and information seeking between cell phone information seekers and nonseekers; and (c) examine cell phone information seeking as a predictor of blood pressure in African American women. Participants (N = 147) completed a survey and had their blood pressure measured. Independent-sample t tests showed a significant difference in systolic blood pressure in cell phone information seekers and nonseekers. Linear regression revealed cell phone information seeking as an independent predictor of systolic blood pressure, despite confounders. It is possible that cell phone information seekers were using health information to make decisions about self-management of blood pressure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalWestern Journal of Nursing Research
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Cell Phones
African Americans
Blood Pressure
Internet
Information Seeking Behavior
Health
Self Care
Linear Models

Keywords

  • African American women
  • cell phone use
  • high blood pressure
  • information seeking behavior
  • self-management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Cell Phone Information Seeking Explains Blood Pressure in African American Women. / Jones, Lenette M.; Veinot, Tiffany C.; Pressler, Susan.

In: Western Journal of Nursing Research, 01.01.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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