Cellular responses to gravity

Extracellular, intracellular and in-between

P. Todd, D. M. Klaus, L. S. Stodieck, J. D. Smith, L. A. Staehelin, Melissa Kacena, B. Manfredi, A. Bukhari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Our understanding of gravitational effects (inertial effects in the vicinity of 1 × g) on cells has matured to a stage at which it is possible to define, on the basis of experimental evidence, extracellular effects on small cells and intracellular effects on eukaryotic gravisensing cells. Yet undetermined is the nature of response, if any, of those classes of cells that are not governed solely by extracellular physical events (as are prokaryotes) and are devoid of obvious mechanical devices for sensing inertial forces (such as those possessed by certain plant cells and sensory cells of animals). This "in-between" class of cells needs to be understood on the basis of the combination of intracellular and extracellular gravity-dependent processes that govern experimentally-measurable variables that are relevant to the cell's responses to modified inertial forces. The forces that certain cell types generate or respond to are therefore compared to those imposed by approximately 1 × g in the context of cytoskeletal action and symmetry-breaking pathways.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1263-1268
Number of pages6
JournalAdvances in Space Research
Volume21
Issue number8-9
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Gravitational effects
Gravitation
Animals
gravity
gravitation
cells
prokaryote
inertia
symmetry
prokaryotes
mechanical devices
gravitational effects
Plant Cells
effect
animal
animals
broken symmetry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics

Cite this

Todd, P., Klaus, D. M., Stodieck, L. S., Smith, J. D., Staehelin, L. A., Kacena, M., ... Bukhari, A. (1998). Cellular responses to gravity: Extracellular, intracellular and in-between. Advances in Space Research, 21(8-9), 1263-1268.

Cellular responses to gravity : Extracellular, intracellular and in-between. / Todd, P.; Klaus, D. M.; Stodieck, L. S.; Smith, J. D.; Staehelin, L. A.; Kacena, Melissa; Manfredi, B.; Bukhari, A.

In: Advances in Space Research, Vol. 21, No. 8-9, 1998, p. 1263-1268.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Todd, P, Klaus, DM, Stodieck, LS, Smith, JD, Staehelin, LA, Kacena, M, Manfredi, B & Bukhari, A 1998, 'Cellular responses to gravity: Extracellular, intracellular and in-between', Advances in Space Research, vol. 21, no. 8-9, pp. 1263-1268.
Todd P, Klaus DM, Stodieck LS, Smith JD, Staehelin LA, Kacena M et al. Cellular responses to gravity: Extracellular, intracellular and in-between. Advances in Space Research. 1998;21(8-9):1263-1268.
Todd, P. ; Klaus, D. M. ; Stodieck, L. S. ; Smith, J. D. ; Staehelin, L. A. ; Kacena, Melissa ; Manfredi, B. ; Bukhari, A. / Cellular responses to gravity : Extracellular, intracellular and in-between. In: Advances in Space Research. 1998 ; Vol. 21, No. 8-9. pp. 1263-1268.
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