Central neural activation following contact sensitivity peripheral immune challenge

Evidence of brain-immune regulation through C fibres

Jeffrey S. Thinschmidt, Michael A. King, Maria Korah, Pablo D. Perez, Marcelo Febo, Jaleel Miyan, Maria B. Grant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study tested the hypothesis that peripheral immune challenges will produce predictable activation patterns in the rat brain consistent with sympathetic excitation. As part of examining this hypothesis, this study asked whether central activation is dependent on capsaicin-sensitive C-fibres. We induced skin contact sensitivity immune responses with 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), in the presence or absence of the acute C-fibre toxin capsaicin (8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide) to trigger immune responses with and without diminished activity of C-fibres. Innovative blood-oxygen-level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging data revealed that the skin contact sensitivity immune responses induced with DNCB were associated with localized increases in brain neuronal activity in treated rats. This response was diminished by pre-treatment with capsaicin 1 week before scans. In the same animals, we found expression of the immediate early gene c-Fos in sub-regions of the amygdala and hypothalamic sympathetic brain nuclei. Significant increases in c-Fos expression were found in the supraoptic nucleus, central amygdala and medial habenula following immune challenges. Our results support the idea that selective brain regions, some of which are associated with sympathetic function, process or modulate immune function through pathways that are partially dependent on C-fibres. Together with previous studies demonstrating the motor control pathways from brain to immune targets, these findings indicate a central neuroimmune system to monitor host status and coordinate appropriate host responses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)206-216
Number of pages11
JournalImmunology
Volume146
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

Fingerprint

Unmyelinated Nerve Fibers
Contact Dermatitis
Capsaicin
Brain
Dinitrochlorobenzene
Amygdala
Habenula
Efferent Pathways
Supraoptic Nucleus
Skin
Immediate-Early Genes
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Oxygen

Keywords

  • Dermatology
  • Immunology
  • Neurobiology
  • Neuroimmune
  • Rat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Thinschmidt, J. S., King, M. A., Korah, M., Perez, P. D., Febo, M., Miyan, J., & Grant, M. B. (2015). Central neural activation following contact sensitivity peripheral immune challenge: Evidence of brain-immune regulation through C fibres. Immunology, 146(2), 206-216. https://doi.org/10.1111/imm.12479

Central neural activation following contact sensitivity peripheral immune challenge : Evidence of brain-immune regulation through C fibres. / Thinschmidt, Jeffrey S.; King, Michael A.; Korah, Maria; Perez, Pablo D.; Febo, Marcelo; Miyan, Jaleel; Grant, Maria B.

In: Immunology, Vol. 146, No. 2, 01.10.2015, p. 206-216.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thinschmidt, JS, King, MA, Korah, M, Perez, PD, Febo, M, Miyan, J & Grant, MB 2015, 'Central neural activation following contact sensitivity peripheral immune challenge: Evidence of brain-immune regulation through C fibres', Immunology, vol. 146, no. 2, pp. 206-216. https://doi.org/10.1111/imm.12479
Thinschmidt, Jeffrey S. ; King, Michael A. ; Korah, Maria ; Perez, Pablo D. ; Febo, Marcelo ; Miyan, Jaleel ; Grant, Maria B. / Central neural activation following contact sensitivity peripheral immune challenge : Evidence of brain-immune regulation through C fibres. In: Immunology. 2015 ; Vol. 146, No. 2. pp. 206-216.
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