Ceramic-on-ceramic implants in total hip arthroplasty

C. W. Colwell, J. A. D'Antonio, William Capello, M. E. Hardwick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Alumina ceramic is an excellent material for biologic implantation. Decreased participate wear debris should increase implant longevity. The purpose of this study is to examine clinical and radiological results of ceramic-on-ceramic hip implants compared to cobalt chrome on polyethylene. Four cementless systems were compared, three alumina-on-alumina bearing systems: System I, porous coated cup; System II, hydroxyapatite-coated cup; Trident system, hydroxyapatite-coated cup with metal sleeve backing on ceramic cup liner; and System III (control), porous-coated cup with polyethylene and cobalt chromium bearing system. Patients were randomized to receive System I, II, or III. Trident patients were not randomized. Examinations are performed at 6 months, 1 year and yearly thereafter including x-rays, clinical exam and Harris Hip Score (HHS). Minimum 24-month followup was performed in 562 ceramic hips and 154 control hips. Age, height, weight, gender and diagnosis were similar in all groups. HHS was rated good/excellent by 95 percent of ceramic hips and 97 percent of control hips. Radiographie results demonstrated radiolucency in Femoral Gruen Zone 1 in 3.8 percent (18/474) of ceramic hips and in 8 percent (10/128) of control hips. Unstable acctabular components were reported in none of ceramic hips and in 3.2 percent (5/154) of control hips. Revision was performed in 7 (1.2 percent) ceramic hips, none due to failure of ceramic materials, and in 9 (5.8 percent) control hips. Alumina ceramic materials show promise, but continued evaluation of long-term clinical results is needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1003-1006
Number of pages4
JournalKey Engineering Materials
Volume284-286
StatePublished - 2005

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Arthroplasty
Aluminum Oxide
Bearings (structural)
Alumina
Polyethylene
Durapatite
Ceramic materials
Cobalt
Hydroxyapatite
Polyethylenes
Chromium
Debris
Metals
Wear of materials
X rays

Keywords

  • Alumina ceramic
  • Total hip arthroplasty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Chemical Engineering (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Colwell, C. W., D'Antonio, J. A., Capello, W., & Hardwick, M. E. (2005). Ceramic-on-ceramic implants in total hip arthroplasty. Key Engineering Materials, 284-286, 1003-1006.

Ceramic-on-ceramic implants in total hip arthroplasty. / Colwell, C. W.; D'Antonio, J. A.; Capello, William; Hardwick, M. E.

In: Key Engineering Materials, Vol. 284-286, 2005, p. 1003-1006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Colwell, CW, D'Antonio, JA, Capello, W & Hardwick, ME 2005, 'Ceramic-on-ceramic implants in total hip arthroplasty', Key Engineering Materials, vol. 284-286, pp. 1003-1006.
Colwell CW, D'Antonio JA, Capello W, Hardwick ME. Ceramic-on-ceramic implants in total hip arthroplasty. Key Engineering Materials. 2005;284-286:1003-1006.
Colwell, C. W. ; D'Antonio, J. A. ; Capello, William ; Hardwick, M. E. / Ceramic-on-ceramic implants in total hip arthroplasty. In: Key Engineering Materials. 2005 ; Vol. 284-286. pp. 1003-1006.
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