Ceramide 1-phosphate mediates endothelial cell invasion via the annexin a2-p11 heterotetrameric protein complex

Jody L. Hankins, Katherine E. Ward, Sam S. Linton, Brian M. Barth, Robert Stahelin, Todd E. Fox, Mark Kester

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The bioactive sphingolipid, ceramide 1-phosphate (C-1-P), has been implicated as an extracellular chemotactic agent directing cellular migration in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and macrophages. However, interacting proteins that could mediate these actions of C-1-P have, thus far, eluded identification. We have now identified and characterized interactions between ceramide 1-phosphate and the annexin a2-p11 heterotetramer constituents. This C-1-P-receptor complex is capable of facilitating cellular invasion. Herein, we demonstrate in both coronary artery macrovascular endothelial cells and retinal microvascular endothelial cells that C-1-P induces invasion through an extracellular matrix barrier. By employing surface plasmon resonance, lipid-binding ELISA, and mass spectrometry technologies, we have demonstrated that the heterotetramer constituents bind to C-1-P. Although the annexin a2-p11 heterotetramer constituents do not bind the lipid C-1-P exclusively, other structurally similar lipids, such as phosphatidylserine, sphingosine 1-phosphate, and phosphatidic acid, could not elicit the potent chemotactic stimulation observed with C-1-P. Further, we show that siRNA-mediated knockdown of either annexin a2 or p11 protein significantly inhibits C-1-P-directed invasion, indicating that the heterotetrameric complex is required for C-1-P-mediated chemotaxis. These results imply that extracellular C-1-P, acting through the extracellular annexin a2-p11 heterotetrameric protein, can mediate vascular endothelial cell invasion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)19726-19738
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume288
Issue number27
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 5 2013

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Annexin A2
Endothelial cells
Endothelial Cells
Proteins
Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Lipids
ceramide 1-phosphate
Phosphatidic Acids
Sphingolipids
Surface Plasmon Resonance
Macrophages
Phosphatidylserines
Surface plasmon resonance
Chemotaxis
Stem cells
Small Interfering RNA
Extracellular Matrix
Mass spectrometry
Mass Spectrometry
Coronary Vessels

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Ceramide 1-phosphate mediates endothelial cell invasion via the annexin a2-p11 heterotetrameric protein complex. / Hankins, Jody L.; Ward, Katherine E.; Linton, Sam S.; Barth, Brian M.; Stahelin, Robert; Fox, Todd E.; Kester, Mark.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 288, No. 27, 05.07.2013, p. 19726-19738.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hankins, Jody L. ; Ward, Katherine E. ; Linton, Sam S. ; Barth, Brian M. ; Stahelin, Robert ; Fox, Todd E. ; Kester, Mark. / Ceramide 1-phosphate mediates endothelial cell invasion via the annexin a2-p11 heterotetrameric protein complex. In: Journal of Biological Chemistry. 2013 ; Vol. 288, No. 27. pp. 19726-19738.
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