Cerebral malaria: Mechanisms of brain injury and strategies for improved neurocognitive outcome

Richard Idro, Kevin Marsh, Chandy C. John, Charles R.J. Newton

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

192 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cerebral malaria is the most severe neurological complication of infection with Plasmodium falciparum. With >575,000 cases annually, children in sub-Saharan Africa are the most affected. Surviving patients have an increased risk of neurological and cognitive deficits, behavioral difficulties, and epilepsy making cerebral malaria a leading cause of childhood neurodisability in the region. The pathogenesis of neurocognitive sequelae is poorly understood: coma develops through multiple mechanisms and there may be several mechanisms of brain injury. It is unclear how an intravascular parasite causes such brain injury. Understanding these mechanisms is important to develop appropriate neuroprotective interventions. This article examines possible mechanisms of brain injury in cerebral malaria, relating this to the pathogenesis of the disease, and explores prospects for improved neurocognitive outcome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)267-274
Number of pages8
JournalPediatric Research
Volume68
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Cerebral malaria: Mechanisms of brain injury and strategies for improved neurocognitive outcome'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this