Cervical cancer metastasis to the brain: A case report and review of literature

Kaleigh Fetcko, Dibson D. Gondim, Jose Bonnin, Mahua Dey

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Intracranial metastasis from cervical cancer is a rare occurrence. Methods: In this study we describe a case of cervical cancer metastasis to the brain and perform an extensive review of literature from 1956 to 2016, to characterize clearly the clinical presentation, treatment options, molecular markers, targeted therapies, and survival of patients with this condition. Results: An elderly woman with history of cervical cancer in remission, presented 2 years later with a right temporo-parietal tumor, which was treated with surgery and subsequent stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to the resection cavity. She then returned 5 months later with a second solitary right lesion; she again underwent surgery and SRS to the resection cavity with no signs of recurrence 6 months later. According to the reviewed literature, the most common clinical presentation included females with median age of 48 years; presenting symptoms such as headache, weakness/hemiplegia/hemiparesis, seizure, and altered mental status (AMS)/confusion; multiple lesions mostly supratentorially located; poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma; and additional recurrences at other sites. The best approach to treatment is a multimodal plan, consisting of SRS or whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for solitary brain metastases followed by chemotherapy for systemic disease, surgery and WBRT for solitary brain lesions without systemic disease, and SRS or WBRT followed by chemotherapy for palliative care. The overall prognosis is poor with a mean and median survival time from diagnosis of brain metastasis of 7 and 4.6 months, respectively. Conclusion: Future efforts through large prospective randomized trials are warranted to better describe the clinical presentation and identify more effective treatment plans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number181
JournalSurgical Neurology International
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Neoplasm Metastasis
Radiosurgery
Brain
Radiotherapy
Molecular Targeted Therapy
Recurrence
Drug Therapy
Hemiplegia
Paresis
Palliative Care
Headache
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Seizures
Therapeutics
Survival Rate
Survival
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Brain metastasis
  • cervical cancer
  • intracranial metastasis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Cervical cancer metastasis to the brain : A case report and review of literature. / Fetcko, Kaleigh; Gondim, Dibson D.; Bonnin, Jose; Dey, Mahua.

In: Surgical Neurology International, Vol. 8, No. 1, 181, 01.01.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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