Challenges of Treating a 466-Kilogram Man With Acute Kidney Injury

Allon Friedman, Brian Decker, Louis Seele, Richard N. Hellman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Caring for super obese patients (body mass index > 50 kg/m2) presents a number of complex and unique clinical challenges, particularly when acute kidney injury is present. We describe our experience treating the heaviest individual with acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy reported to date. A 24-year-old black man was admitted to our hospital with fever, vomiting, progressive weakness, shortness of breath, and hemoptysis. Admission weight was 1,024 lbs (466 kg), height was 6 ft 4 in (1.9 m), and body mass index was 125 kg/m2. During hospitalization, the patient experienced oligoanuric acute kidney injury and required initiation of continuous and subsequently intermittent renal replacement therapy. This clinical scenario identifies the many challenges involved in caring for super obese patients with acute kidney injury and may be a harbinger of what awaits the nephrology community in the obesity pandemic era.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)140-143
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Kidney Diseases
Volume52
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2008

Fingerprint

Acute Kidney Injury
Renal Replacement Therapy
Body Mass Index
Nephrology
Hemoptysis
Pandemics
Dyspnea
Vomiting
Hospitalization
Fever
Obesity
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • acute kidney injury
  • dialysis
  • drug dosing
  • Obesity
  • renal replacement therapy
  • super obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

Cite this

Challenges of Treating a 466-Kilogram Man With Acute Kidney Injury. / Friedman, Allon; Decker, Brian; Seele, Louis; Hellman, Richard N.

In: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Vol. 52, No. 1, 07.2008, p. 140-143.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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