Change in Psychotropic Prescribing Patterns Among Youths in Foster Care Associated With a Peer-to-Peer Physician Consultation Program

Brea Perry, Kelda Harris Walsh, Martin H. Plawecki, Jill C. Fodstad, Hillary S. Blake, Amber Hunt, Carol Ott, Richard Rowlison, William R. McConnell, Katlyn Kleimola, Leslie A. Hulvershorn

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

Abstract

There has been growing concern about the safety and efficacy of psychotropic prescribing practices for children enrolled in Medicaid and in foster care.1 In response, accreditation organizations and policymakers have developed standards for optimal use of psychotropic medications among children.2 In addition, federal legislation has prompted states to implement monitoring programs to address quality and safety issues among vulnerable pediatric subpopulations.3,4 Here, we report findings from an evaluation of Indiana's program for foster youth, which used outlier case review followed by peer-to-peer consultation between prescribing physicians and child and adolescent psychiatrists. We observed clinically and statistically significant reductions in polypharmacy, off-label prescribing, inpatient hospitalizations, health care costs, and related outcomes among youths randomized to an immediate intervention group compared to no improvements in a waitlist control group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1218-1222.e1
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume58
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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