Changes of glucose levels precede dementia in African-Americans with diabetes but not in Caucasians

Hugh C. Hendrie, Mengjie Zheng, Kathleen A. Lane, Roberta Ambuehl, Christianna Purnell, Shanshan Li, Frederick W. Unverzagt, Michael D. Murray, Ashok Balasubramanyam, Chris M. Callahan, Sujuan Gao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Changes in glucose levels may represent a powerful metabolic indicator of dementia in African-Americans with diabetes. It is unclear whether these changes also occur in Caucasians. Methods: A secondary data analysis using electronic medical records from 5228 African-Americans and Caucasians aged ≥65 years was carried out. Mixed effects models with repeated serum glucose measurements were used to compare changes in glucose levels between African-Americans and Caucasian patients with and without incident dementia. Results: African-Americans and Caucasians with diabetes had significantly different changes in glucose levels by dementia status (P <.0001). African-Americans experienced a significant decline in glucose levels before the dementia diagnosis (estimated glucose decline 1.3421 mg/dL per year, P <.0001) than those who did not develop dementia. Caucasians with and without dementia showed stable glucose levels over time (P =.3071). Discussion: Significant changes in glucose levels precede dementia in African-American patients with diabetes but not in Caucasians.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1572-1579
Number of pages8
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia
Volume14
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2018

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Keywords

  • African-Americans
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Caucasians
  • Dementia
  • Diabetes
  • Early detection
  • Electronic medical records
  • Glucose levels
  • Longitudinal risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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