Child- and caregiver-reported problems and concerns in using asthma medications

Betsy Sleath, Guadalupe X. Ayala, Stephanie Davis, Dennis Williams, Gail Tudor, Karin Yeatts, Deidre Washington, Chris Gillette

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives. The purpose of the study was to (a) describe the types of medication problems/concerns that asthmatic children and their caregivers reported and (b) examine the association between child and caregiver demographic and sociocultural characteristics and reported asthma medication problems/concerns. Methods. Children ages 8 through 16 with mild, moderate, or severe persistent asthma and their caregivers were recruited at five pediatric practices in nonurban areas of North Carolina. Children were interviewed and caregivers completed questionnaires after their child's medical visits about reported problems/concerns in using asthma medications. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyze the data. Results. Three hundred and twenty children were recruited. Eighty-seven percent of the children reported a problem or concern in using their asthma medications. Approximately 40% of children reported side effects and a similar percent stated that it was hard to understand the directions on their medicines; in addition 60% reported that it was hard to remember when to take their medicines. Females and non-White children were significantly more likely to report they were not sure how to use an inhaler than males and White children. Younger and non-White children were significantly more likely to report it was hard to understand the directions on their medicines than older and White children. Caregivers were most likely to report that their children were bothered a little or a lot by side effects (31%) and a similar percent (29%) were not sure their children were using their inhalers properly. Caregivers without Medicaid were significantly more likely to report difficulty paying for the asthma medications. Conclusions. Medication side effects are a significant problem area for both children and their caregivers, and inhaler skillbased training is particularly needed for non-White children. Health care providers should discuss with children and their caregivers the types of problems/concerns that children may have when using their asthma medications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)633-638
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Asthma
Volume47
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Asthma
  • Medications
  • Problems and concerns
  • Side effects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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  • Cite this

    Sleath, B., Ayala, G. X., Davis, S., Williams, D., Tudor, G., Yeatts, K., Washington, D., & Gillette, C. (2010). Child- and caregiver-reported problems and concerns in using asthma medications. Journal of Asthma, 47(6), 633-638. https://doi.org/10.3109/02770901003692785