Children with new onset seizures: A prospective study of parent variables, child behavior problems, and seizure occurrence

Joan K. Austin, Linda C. Haber, David Dunn, Cheryl P. Shore, Cynthia S. Johnson, Susan Perkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Parent variables (stigma, mood, unmet needs for information and support, and worry) are associated with behavioral difficulties in children with seizures; however, it is not known how this relationship is influenced by additional seizures. This study followed children (ages 4-14. years) and their parents over a 24-month period (with data collected at baseline and 6, 12, and 24. months) and investigated the effect of an additional seizure on the relationship between parenting variables and child behavior difficulties. Methods: The sample was parents of 196 children (104 girls and 92 boys) with a first seizure within the past 6. weeks. Child mean age at baseline was 8. years, 3. months (SD 3. years). Data were analyzed using t-tests, chi-square tests, and repeated measures analyses of covariance. Results: Relationships between parent variables, additional seizures, and child behavior problems were consistent across time. Several associations between parent variables and child behavior problems were stronger in the additional seizure group than in the no additional seizure group. Conclusions: Findings suggest that interventions that assist families to respond constructively to the reactions of others regarding their child's seizure condition and to address their needs for information and support could help families of children with continuing seizures to have an improved quality of life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)73-77
Number of pages5
JournalEpilepsy and Behavior
Volume53
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

Fingerprint

Child Behavior
Seizures
Prospective Studies
Parents
Parenting
Chi-Square Distribution
Quality of Life

Keywords

  • Child behavior problems
  • First seizure
  • Need for information and support
  • Parents
  • Stigma
  • Worry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Neurology

Cite this

Children with new onset seizures : A prospective study of parent variables, child behavior problems, and seizure occurrence. / Austin, Joan K.; Haber, Linda C.; Dunn, David; Shore, Cheryl P.; Johnson, Cynthia S.; Perkins, Susan.

In: Epilepsy and Behavior, Vol. 53, 01.12.2015, p. 73-77.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{d3bc11971de24cf8aad5281e1c18789a,
title = "Children with new onset seizures: A prospective study of parent variables, child behavior problems, and seizure occurrence",
abstract = "Objective: Parent variables (stigma, mood, unmet needs for information and support, and worry) are associated with behavioral difficulties in children with seizures; however, it is not known how this relationship is influenced by additional seizures. This study followed children (ages 4-14. years) and their parents over a 24-month period (with data collected at baseline and 6, 12, and 24. months) and investigated the effect of an additional seizure on the relationship between parenting variables and child behavior difficulties. Methods: The sample was parents of 196 children (104 girls and 92 boys) with a first seizure within the past 6. weeks. Child mean age at baseline was 8. years, 3. months (SD 3. years). Data were analyzed using t-tests, chi-square tests, and repeated measures analyses of covariance. Results: Relationships between parent variables, additional seizures, and child behavior problems were consistent across time. Several associations between parent variables and child behavior problems were stronger in the additional seizure group than in the no additional seizure group. Conclusions: Findings suggest that interventions that assist families to respond constructively to the reactions of others regarding their child's seizure condition and to address their needs for information and support could help families of children with continuing seizures to have an improved quality of life.",
keywords = "Child behavior problems, First seizure, Need for information and support, Parents, Stigma, Worry",
author = "Austin, {Joan K.} and Haber, {Linda C.} and David Dunn and Shore, {Cheryl P.} and Johnson, {Cynthia S.} and Susan Perkins",
year = "2015",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.yebeh.2015.09.019",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "53",
pages = "73--77",
journal = "Epilepsy and Behavior",
issn = "1525-5050",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Children with new onset seizures

T2 - A prospective study of parent variables, child behavior problems, and seizure occurrence

AU - Austin, Joan K.

AU - Haber, Linda C.

AU - Dunn, David

AU - Shore, Cheryl P.

AU - Johnson, Cynthia S.

AU - Perkins, Susan

PY - 2015/12/1

Y1 - 2015/12/1

N2 - Objective: Parent variables (stigma, mood, unmet needs for information and support, and worry) are associated with behavioral difficulties in children with seizures; however, it is not known how this relationship is influenced by additional seizures. This study followed children (ages 4-14. years) and their parents over a 24-month period (with data collected at baseline and 6, 12, and 24. months) and investigated the effect of an additional seizure on the relationship between parenting variables and child behavior difficulties. Methods: The sample was parents of 196 children (104 girls and 92 boys) with a first seizure within the past 6. weeks. Child mean age at baseline was 8. years, 3. months (SD 3. years). Data were analyzed using t-tests, chi-square tests, and repeated measures analyses of covariance. Results: Relationships between parent variables, additional seizures, and child behavior problems were consistent across time. Several associations between parent variables and child behavior problems were stronger in the additional seizure group than in the no additional seizure group. Conclusions: Findings suggest that interventions that assist families to respond constructively to the reactions of others regarding their child's seizure condition and to address their needs for information and support could help families of children with continuing seizures to have an improved quality of life.

AB - Objective: Parent variables (stigma, mood, unmet needs for information and support, and worry) are associated with behavioral difficulties in children with seizures; however, it is not known how this relationship is influenced by additional seizures. This study followed children (ages 4-14. years) and their parents over a 24-month period (with data collected at baseline and 6, 12, and 24. months) and investigated the effect of an additional seizure on the relationship between parenting variables and child behavior difficulties. Methods: The sample was parents of 196 children (104 girls and 92 boys) with a first seizure within the past 6. weeks. Child mean age at baseline was 8. years, 3. months (SD 3. years). Data were analyzed using t-tests, chi-square tests, and repeated measures analyses of covariance. Results: Relationships between parent variables, additional seizures, and child behavior problems were consistent across time. Several associations between parent variables and child behavior problems were stronger in the additional seizure group than in the no additional seizure group. Conclusions: Findings suggest that interventions that assist families to respond constructively to the reactions of others regarding their child's seizure condition and to address their needs for information and support could help families of children with continuing seizures to have an improved quality of life.

KW - Child behavior problems

KW - First seizure

KW - Need for information and support

KW - Parents

KW - Stigma

KW - Worry

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84946406411&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84946406411&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.yebeh.2015.09.019

DO - 10.1016/j.yebeh.2015.09.019

M3 - Article

C2 - 26520879

AN - SCOPUS:84946406411

VL - 53

SP - 73

EP - 77

JO - Epilepsy and Behavior

JF - Epilepsy and Behavior

SN - 1525-5050

ER -