Cholecystectomy, gallstones, tonsillectomy, and pancreatic cancer risk

A population-based case-control study in minnesota

Jianjun Zhang , A. E. Prizment, I. B. Dhakal, K. E. Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Associations between medical conditions and pancreatic cancer risk are controversial and are thus evaluated in a study conducted during 1994-1998 in Minnesota. Methods: Cases (n=215) were ascertained from hospitals in the metropolitan area of the Twin Cities and the Mayo Clinic. Controls (n=676) were randomly selected from the general population and frequency matched to cases by age and sex. The history of medical conditions was gathered with a questionnaire during in-person interviews. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. Results: After adjustment for confounders, subjects who had cholecystectomy or gallstones experienced a significantly higher risk of pancreatic cancer than those who did not (OR (95% CI): 2.11 (1.32-3.35) for cholecystectomy and 1.97 (1.23-3.12) for gallstones), whereas opposite results were observed for tonsillectomy (0.67 (0.48-0.94)). Increased risk associated with cholecystectomy was the greatest when it occurred ≤2 years before the cancer diagnosis (5.93 (2.36-15.7)) but remained statistically significant when that interval was ≥20 years (2.27 (1.16-4.32)). Conclusions: Cholecystectomy, gallstones, and tonsillectomy were associated with an altered risk of pancreatic cancer. Our study suggests that cholecystectomy increased risk but reverse causality may partially account for high risk associated with recent cholecystectomy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2348-2353
Number of pages6
JournalBritish Journal of Cancer
Volume110
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 29 2014

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Tonsillectomy
Cholecystectomy
Gallstones
Pancreatic Neoplasms
Case-Control Studies
Population
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Urban Hospitals
Causality
Logistic Models
History
Interviews
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • case-control study
  • cholecystectomy
  • gallstones
  • pancreatic cancer
  • tonsillectomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Cholecystectomy, gallstones, tonsillectomy, and pancreatic cancer risk : A population-based case-control study in minnesota. / Zhang , Jianjun; Prizment, A. E.; Dhakal, I. B.; Anderson, K. E.

In: British Journal of Cancer, Vol. 110, No. 9, 29.04.2014, p. 2348-2353.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Associations between medical conditions and pancreatic cancer risk are controversial and are thus evaluated in a study conducted during 1994-1998 in Minnesota. Methods: Cases (n=215) were ascertained from hospitals in the metropolitan area of the Twin Cities and the Mayo Clinic. Controls (n=676) were randomly selected from the general population and frequency matched to cases by age and sex. The history of medical conditions was gathered with a questionnaire during in-person interviews. Odds ratios (OR) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (95{\%} CI) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. Results: After adjustment for confounders, subjects who had cholecystectomy or gallstones experienced a significantly higher risk of pancreatic cancer than those who did not (OR (95{\%} CI): 2.11 (1.32-3.35) for cholecystectomy and 1.97 (1.23-3.12) for gallstones), whereas opposite results were observed for tonsillectomy (0.67 (0.48-0.94)). Increased risk associated with cholecystectomy was the greatest when it occurred ≤2 years before the cancer diagnosis (5.93 (2.36-15.7)) but remained statistically significant when that interval was ≥20 years (2.27 (1.16-4.32)). Conclusions: Cholecystectomy, gallstones, and tonsillectomy were associated with an altered risk of pancreatic cancer. Our study suggests that cholecystectomy increased risk but reverse causality may partially account for high risk associated with recent cholecystectomy.",
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