Chronic continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) reduces airway reactivity in vivo in an allergen-induced rabbit model of asthma

Z. Xue, Y. Yu, H. Gao, S. J. Gunst, R. S. Tepper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

Previous studies have demonstrated that chronic mechanical strain produced by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) reduces in vivo airway reactivity in rabbits and ferrets. For CPAP to potentially have a therapeutic benefit for asthmatic subjects, the reduction in airway responsiveness would need to persist for 12-24 h after its discontinuation, require application for only part of the day, and be effective in the presence of atopic airway inflammation. In the present study, airway responsiveness to acetylcholine or methacholine was measured during mechanical ventilation following three different protocols in which active, nonanesthetized, tracheotomized rabbits were treated with High vs. Low CPAP (6 vs. 0 cmH 2O). 1) High CPAP was applied continuously for 4 days followed by 1 day of Low CPAP; 2) High CPAP was applied at night and Low CPAP during the daytime for 4 days, and 3) High CPAP was applied for 4 days in animals following ovalbumin (Ova) sensitization and challenge. For all three protocols, treatment with High CPAP resulted in significantly reduced airway responsiveness compared with treatment with Low CPAP. Cumulatively, our in vivo results in rabbits suggest that high CPAP, even when applied only at night, produces a persistent reduction of airway responsiveness. In addition, CPAP reduces airway responsiveness even in the presence of atopic airway inflammation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)353-357
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume111
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2011

Keywords

  • Airway inflammation
  • Chronic mechanical strain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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