Chronic group A coxsackievirus infection in agammaglobulinemia

Demonstration of genomic variation of serotypically identical isolates persistently excreted by the same patient

K. M. O'Neil, M. A. Pallansch, J. A. Winkelstein, Thomas Lock, J. F. Modlin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Oligonucleotide fingerprinting by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis is used to study genetic variation within families of certain related RNA viruses. When applied to the polioviruses, fingerprinting reveals little variation in the genome of a strain of virus that is passed in cell culture, but mutations are regularly observed when poliovirus strains spread in human populations. Sequential infection of an immunodeficient child with two different serotypes of group A coxsackievirus provided an opportunity to study the genomic changes that individual enterovirus strains undergo during prolonged replication in a single human host.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)183-186
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume157
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Coxsackievirus Infections
Agammaglobulinemia
Poliovirus
Enterovirus
RNA Viruses
Electrophoresis, Gel, Two-Dimensional
Oligonucleotides
Cell Culture Techniques
Genome
Viruses
Mutation
Infection
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Chronic group A coxsackievirus infection in agammaglobulinemia : Demonstration of genomic variation of serotypically identical isolates persistently excreted by the same patient. / O'Neil, K. M.; Pallansch, M. A.; Winkelstein, J. A.; Lock, Thomas; Modlin, J. F.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 157, No. 1, 1988, p. 183-186.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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