Chronic kidney disease is associated with oxidative stress independent of hypertension

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Abstract

Background: Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and essential hypertension (EHTN). However, the role of hypertension in causing increased oxidative stress in patients with CKD is unknown. Methods: We performed a case control study in patients with EHTN and those with equal blood pressure assessed by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring but with concomitant CKD. Those with diabetes mellitus and those taking renin angiotensin inhibitors were excluded. Biomarkers of oxidative stress, malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonylation and total glutathione levels were measured. Results: Average (SD) 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure in 12 patients with CKD was 134 (17)/75 (16) compared to 134 (10)/80 (9) in 11 patients with EHTN (p = NS). Plasma MDA in CKD was 0.89 ± 0.38 μmol/l compared to 0.68 ± 0.16 μmol/l in EHTN (p = 0.07). Urinary MDA/creatinine ratio was 1.78 (0.31) in CKD vs 1.43 (0.69) μmol/g in those with EHTN (p = 0.04). Thus, lipid peroxidation was increased in urine of CKD patients. Patients with CKD had higher (1.04 (0.20) nmol) carbonyl/mg protein compared to those with EHTN (0.80 (0.21) nmol carbonyl/mg protein) (p = 0.03). Thus, protein carbonylation was increased in CKD patients. Total glutathione in CKD and EHTN patients was 6.6 (1.8) ng/ml and 7.3 (3.1) ng/ml (p = NS). There was a good correlation between biomarkers of lipid (MDA) and protein oxidation (protein carbonyls) (r = 0.6, p = 0.004). Conclusions: Biomarkers of lipid and protein oxidation are higher in patients with CKD compared to EHTN despite similar blood pressure. Thus, nonhemodynamic factors such as inflammation and altered cellular redox state may play a greater role in the generation of oxidative stress in CKD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)377-383
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Nephrology
Volume61
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 2004

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Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Oxidative Stress
Hypertension
Malondialdehyde
Protein Carbonylation
Biomarkers
Blood Pressure
Proteins
Glutathione
Lipids
Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring
Essential Hypertension
Angiotensins
Heat-Shock Proteins
Renin
Lipid Peroxidation
Oxidation-Reduction
Case-Control Studies
Creatinine
Diabetes Mellitus

Keywords

  • Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring
  • Carbonyl stress
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Hypertension
  • Malondialdehyde
  • Oxidative stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

Cite this

Chronic kidney disease is associated with oxidative stress independent of hypertension. / Agarwal, Rajiv.

In: Clinical Nephrology, Vol. 61, No. 6, 06.2004, p. 377-383.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and essential hypertension (EHTN). However, the role of hypertension in causing increased oxidative stress in patients with CKD is unknown. Methods: We performed a case control study in patients with EHTN and those with equal blood pressure assessed by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring but with concomitant CKD. Those with diabetes mellitus and those taking renin angiotensin inhibitors were excluded. Biomarkers of oxidative stress, malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonylation and total glutathione levels were measured. Results: Average (SD) 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure in 12 patients with CKD was 134 (17)/75 (16) compared to 134 (10)/80 (9) in 11 patients with EHTN (p = NS). Plasma MDA in CKD was 0.89 ± 0.38 μmol/l compared to 0.68 ± 0.16 μmol/l in EHTN (p = 0.07). Urinary MDA/creatinine ratio was 1.78 (0.31) in CKD vs 1.43 (0.69) μmol/g in those with EHTN (p = 0.04). Thus, lipid peroxidation was increased in urine of CKD patients. Patients with CKD had higher (1.04 (0.20) nmol) carbonyl/mg protein compared to those with EHTN (0.80 (0.21) nmol carbonyl/mg protein) (p = 0.03). Thus, protein carbonylation was increased in CKD patients. Total glutathione in CKD and EHTN patients was 6.6 (1.8) ng/ml and 7.3 (3.1) ng/ml (p = NS). There was a good correlation between biomarkers of lipid (MDA) and protein oxidation (protein carbonyls) (r = 0.6, p = 0.004). Conclusions: Biomarkers of lipid and protein oxidation are higher in patients with CKD compared to EHTN despite similar blood pressure. Thus, nonhemodynamic factors such as inflammation and altered cellular redox state may play a greater role in the generation of oxidative stress in CKD.",
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N2 - Background: Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and essential hypertension (EHTN). However, the role of hypertension in causing increased oxidative stress in patients with CKD is unknown. Methods: We performed a case control study in patients with EHTN and those with equal blood pressure assessed by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring but with concomitant CKD. Those with diabetes mellitus and those taking renin angiotensin inhibitors were excluded. Biomarkers of oxidative stress, malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonylation and total glutathione levels were measured. Results: Average (SD) 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure in 12 patients with CKD was 134 (17)/75 (16) compared to 134 (10)/80 (9) in 11 patients with EHTN (p = NS). Plasma MDA in CKD was 0.89 ± 0.38 μmol/l compared to 0.68 ± 0.16 μmol/l in EHTN (p = 0.07). Urinary MDA/creatinine ratio was 1.78 (0.31) in CKD vs 1.43 (0.69) μmol/g in those with EHTN (p = 0.04). Thus, lipid peroxidation was increased in urine of CKD patients. Patients with CKD had higher (1.04 (0.20) nmol) carbonyl/mg protein compared to those with EHTN (0.80 (0.21) nmol carbonyl/mg protein) (p = 0.03). Thus, protein carbonylation was increased in CKD patients. Total glutathione in CKD and EHTN patients was 6.6 (1.8) ng/ml and 7.3 (3.1) ng/ml (p = NS). There was a good correlation between biomarkers of lipid (MDA) and protein oxidation (protein carbonyls) (r = 0.6, p = 0.004). Conclusions: Biomarkers of lipid and protein oxidation are higher in patients with CKD compared to EHTN despite similar blood pressure. Thus, nonhemodynamic factors such as inflammation and altered cellular redox state may play a greater role in the generation of oxidative stress in CKD.

AB - Background: Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and essential hypertension (EHTN). However, the role of hypertension in causing increased oxidative stress in patients with CKD is unknown. Methods: We performed a case control study in patients with EHTN and those with equal blood pressure assessed by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring but with concomitant CKD. Those with diabetes mellitus and those taking renin angiotensin inhibitors were excluded. Biomarkers of oxidative stress, malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonylation and total glutathione levels were measured. Results: Average (SD) 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure in 12 patients with CKD was 134 (17)/75 (16) compared to 134 (10)/80 (9) in 11 patients with EHTN (p = NS). Plasma MDA in CKD was 0.89 ± 0.38 μmol/l compared to 0.68 ± 0.16 μmol/l in EHTN (p = 0.07). Urinary MDA/creatinine ratio was 1.78 (0.31) in CKD vs 1.43 (0.69) μmol/g in those with EHTN (p = 0.04). Thus, lipid peroxidation was increased in urine of CKD patients. Patients with CKD had higher (1.04 (0.20) nmol) carbonyl/mg protein compared to those with EHTN (0.80 (0.21) nmol carbonyl/mg protein) (p = 0.03). Thus, protein carbonylation was increased in CKD patients. Total glutathione in CKD and EHTN patients was 6.6 (1.8) ng/ml and 7.3 (3.1) ng/ml (p = NS). There was a good correlation between biomarkers of lipid (MDA) and protein oxidation (protein carbonyls) (r = 0.6, p = 0.004). Conclusions: Biomarkers of lipid and protein oxidation are higher in patients with CKD compared to EHTN despite similar blood pressure. Thus, nonhemodynamic factors such as inflammation and altered cellular redox state may play a greater role in the generation of oxidative stress in CKD.

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