Citalopram Intervention for Hostility

Results of a Randomized Clinical Trial

Thomas W. Kamarck, Roger F. Haskett, Matthew Muldoon, Janine D. Flory, Barbara Anderson, Robert Bies, Bruce Pollock, Stephen B. Manuck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hostility is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Because central serotonin may modulate aggression, we might expect selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to be effective in reducing hostility. Such effects have never been examined in individuals scoring high on hostility who are otherwise free from major Axis I psychopathology according to criteria in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., Text Revision; American Psychiatric Association, 2000). A total of 159 participants (ages 30-50 years, 50% female) scoring high on 2 measures of hostility and with no current major Axis I diagnosis were randomly assigned to 2 months of citalopram (40 mg, fixed-flexible dose) or placebo. Adherence was assessed by electronic measurement and by drug exposure assessment. Treated participants showed larger reductions in state anger (Condition × Time; p = .01), hostile affect (p = 02), and, among women only, physical and verbal aggression (p = .005) relative to placebo controls. Treatment was also associated with relative increases in perceived social support (p = .04). The findings have implications for understanding the central nervous system correlates of hostility, its associations with other psychosocial risk factors for CVD, and, potentially, the design of effective interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)174-188
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume77
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Citalopram
Hostility
Randomized Controlled Trials
Aggression
Cardiovascular Diseases
Placebos
Anger
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors
Psychopathology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Social Support
Serotonin
Central Nervous System
Psychology
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • cardiovascular disease
  • hostility
  • social support
  • SSRIs
  • treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Kamarck, T. W., Haskett, R. F., Muldoon, M., Flory, J. D., Anderson, B., Bies, R., ... Manuck, S. B. (2009). Citalopram Intervention for Hostility: Results of a Randomized Clinical Trial. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 77(1), 174-188. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0014394

Citalopram Intervention for Hostility : Results of a Randomized Clinical Trial. / Kamarck, Thomas W.; Haskett, Roger F.; Muldoon, Matthew; Flory, Janine D.; Anderson, Barbara; Bies, Robert; Pollock, Bruce; Manuck, Stephen B.

In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 77, No. 1, 02.2009, p. 174-188.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kamarck, TW, Haskett, RF, Muldoon, M, Flory, JD, Anderson, B, Bies, R, Pollock, B & Manuck, SB 2009, 'Citalopram Intervention for Hostility: Results of a Randomized Clinical Trial', Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 77, no. 1, pp. 174-188. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0014394
Kamarck, Thomas W. ; Haskett, Roger F. ; Muldoon, Matthew ; Flory, Janine D. ; Anderson, Barbara ; Bies, Robert ; Pollock, Bruce ; Manuck, Stephen B. / Citalopram Intervention for Hostility : Results of a Randomized Clinical Trial. In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. 2009 ; Vol. 77, No. 1. pp. 174-188.
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