Clean technique for intermittent self-catheterization

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Seven patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction who ranged in age from 16 to 54 years, and who had been on sterile intermittent self-catheterization, were changed to dean intermittent self-catheterization. Urine was monitored for one year after changing to clean technique. Urine specimens obtained while on clean technique were bacteriologically equivalent to urine specimens exam-ined while patkus were on sterile technique; the only exception to equivalent urine results were in patients who did not catheterize themselves at frequent intervals. Renal function tests on all patients were also normal. The clean, intermittent selfcatheterization technique was effective, since infection did not seem to be caused by introducing bacteria into the bladder via the urethra.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-18
Number of pages6
JournalNursing Research
Volume25
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1976

Fingerprint

Catheterization
Urine
Neurogenic Urinary Bladder
Urethra
Urinary Bladder
Bacteria
Kidney
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Clean technique for intermittent self-catheterization. / Champion, Victoria.

In: Nursing Research, Vol. 25, No. 1, 1976, p. 13-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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