Clinical and basic science studies of human umbilical cord blood

Implications for the GVL effect following cord blood transplantation

Jay Gaddy, Pierluigi Porcu, Hal Broxmeyer

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human umbilical cord blood (CB) is a readily available source of stem cells and naive or ontogenically immature leukocytes [1-7]. Increasingly, CB is being utilized as an alternative to bone marrow (BM) for stem-cell transplants. The first CB transplant was performed in 1988 as a treatment for Fanconi's anemia [8]. Numerous CB transplants have since been performed to treat a variety of malignant and nonmalignant hematopoietic diseases as well as metabolic disorders [9,10]. Umbilical cord blood presents multiple advantages over bone marrow as a source of stem cells: harvesting presents no donor risk or discomfort, the product carries less likelihood of infectious disease transmission, and collection can be targeted to include minority groups underrepresented in BM donor registries [11-13]. Clinical results worldwide of CB transplantation performed in settings-ranging from matched sibling to mismatched unrelated-are encouraging. In general, the time to neutrophil engraftment is similar to that for bone marrow transplant (BMT) [10]. Importantly, there is less likelihood of severe acute graftversus-host disease (aGVHD) following CB transplants even when unrelated mismatched grafts are used [9,12,14-17]. Potential downsides to CB transplantation are delayed time to platelet independence and questions regarding the ability to engraft adults [13]. However, there are reports in the literature of adult-size patients being successfully engrafted by CB [17-19].

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAllogeneic Immunotherapy for Malignant Diseases
PublisherCRC Press
Pages267-284
Number of pages18
ISBN (Electronic)9780203909508
ISBN (Print)9780824767815
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

Fingerprint

Fetal Blood
Transplantation
Transplants
Stem Cells
Bone Marrow
Tissue Donors
Fanconi Anemia
Minority Groups
Aptitude
Infectious Disease Transmission
Bone Marrow Cells
Registries
Siblings
Neutrophils
Leukocytes
Blood Platelets

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Gaddy, J., Porcu, P., & Broxmeyer, H. (2000). Clinical and basic science studies of human umbilical cord blood: Implications for the GVL effect following cord blood transplantation. In Allogeneic Immunotherapy for Malignant Diseases (pp. 267-284). CRC Press.

Clinical and basic science studies of human umbilical cord blood : Implications for the GVL effect following cord blood transplantation. / Gaddy, Jay; Porcu, Pierluigi; Broxmeyer, Hal.

Allogeneic Immunotherapy for Malignant Diseases. CRC Press, 2000. p. 267-284.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Gaddy, J, Porcu, P & Broxmeyer, H 2000, Clinical and basic science studies of human umbilical cord blood: Implications for the GVL effect following cord blood transplantation. in Allogeneic Immunotherapy for Malignant Diseases. CRC Press, pp. 267-284.
Gaddy J, Porcu P, Broxmeyer H. Clinical and basic science studies of human umbilical cord blood: Implications for the GVL effect following cord blood transplantation. In Allogeneic Immunotherapy for Malignant Diseases. CRC Press. 2000. p. 267-284
Gaddy, Jay ; Porcu, Pierluigi ; Broxmeyer, Hal. / Clinical and basic science studies of human umbilical cord blood : Implications for the GVL effect following cord blood transplantation. Allogeneic Immunotherapy for Malignant Diseases. CRC Press, 2000. pp. 267-284
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