Clinical presentation of patients with eosinophilic inflammation of the esophagus

Sachin Baxi, Sandeep Gupta, Nancy Swigonski, Joseph F. Fitzgerald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Allergic eosinophilic esophagitis (AEE) is defined by a dense infiltrate of eosinophils within the esophageal mucosa and the absence of pathological gastroesophageal reflux. Objective: To characterize a pediatric population with AEE to determine if AEE can be diagnosed based on history; to compare patients with varying degrees of esophageal eosinophilic inflammation to determine if moderate esophageal inflammation is part of a continuum of AEE. Design: Medical records of 112 patients with eosinophils on esophageal biopsy specimens were reviewed. Patients were grouped according to eosinophils per high power field (eos/hpf): group 1 (1-5 eos/hpf, n = 31), group 2 (6-14 eos/hpf, n = 13), and group 3 (≥15 eos/hpf, n = 68) and compared. Setting: University Children's Hospital. Patients: Children and adolescents with eosinophils on esophageal mucosal biopsy specimens. Interventions: Analysis of clinical information. Main Outcome Measurements: Clinical characterization of patients with esophageal eosinophilia. Results: There was no significant difference in patient demographics. Patients in groups 2 and 3 had multiple food allergens identified. Patients in group 3 with a positive type I allergic response were significantly younger than those with a negative response (mean, 4.6 years old vs mean, 8.5 years old; P = .0065). In group 2, 3 of 13 patients responded histologically to acid-suppressive therapy, whereas 6 patients had improved histology with corticosteroids; 4 of these 6 patients had not responded histologically to acid-suppression. Limitations: Retrospective study. Conclusions: History and clinical presentation were not useful in predicting the severity of histologic esophageal inflammation in this cohort. Patients with moderate esophageal eosinophilia (group 2) exhibited a variable response to medical therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)473-478
Number of pages6
JournalGastrointestinal Endoscopy
Volume64
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2006

Fingerprint

Esophagus
Inflammation
Eosinophils
Eosinophilic Esophagitis
Eosinophilia
History
Biopsy
Acids
Gastroesophageal Reflux
Allergens
Medical Records
Histology
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Retrospective Studies
Demography
Pediatrics
Food

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Clinical presentation of patients with eosinophilic inflammation of the esophagus. / Baxi, Sachin; Gupta, Sandeep; Swigonski, Nancy; Fitzgerald, Joseph F.

In: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, Vol. 64, No. 4, 10.2006, p. 473-478.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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