Clinical Profile, Etiology, and Treatment of Chronic Pancreatitis in North American Women: Analysis of a Large Multicenter Cohort

Joseph Romagnuolo, Jyothsna Talluri, Elizabeth Kennard, Bimaljit S. Sandhu, Stuart Sherman, Gregory A. Cote, Samer Al-Kaade, Timothy B. Gardner, Andres Gelrud, Michele D. Lewis, Christopher E. Forsmark, Nalini M. Guda, Darwin L. Conwell, Peter A. Banks, Thiruvengadam Muniraj, Stephen R. Wisniewski, Y. Tian, C. M. Wilcox, Michelle A. Anderson, Randall E. BrandAdam Slivka, David Whitcomb, Dhiraj Yadav

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Historically, chronic pancreatitis (CP) was considered a disease of alcoholic males, but recent data suggest its etiology to be complex. To better understand CP in women, we compared data on women and men with CP in a large, prospectively ascertained multicenter US cohort. METHODS: Patients with CP enrolled in the NAPS2 Continuation and Validation study were studied. Information on demographics, etiology, risk factors, phenotype, and treatment(s) used was obtained from detailed questionnaires completed by the patients and physicians. RESULTS: Of 521 cases, 45% were women. Women were significantly (P <0.05) less likely to have alcohol etiology (30% vs 58.5%) and more likely to have nonalcoholic etiologies (idiopathic, 32% vs 18%; obstructive, 12% vs 2.4%; genetic, 12.8% vs 7.3%). Demographics, pain experience, morphologic findings, exocrine and endocrine insufficiency, CP-related disability, and use of medical therapies were mostly similar in both sexes. Sphincterotomy (biliary, 33% vs 24%; pancreatic, 38% vs 28%; P <0.05) was performed more frequently in women, whereas cyst/pseudocyst operations were more common in men (6.6 vs 2.6%, P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Most CP cases in women are from nonalcoholic etiologies. In contrast to many other chronic diseases, clinical phenotype of CP is determined by the disease and is independent of sex.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPancreas
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Mar 10 2016

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Chronic Pancreatitis
Therapeutics
Demography
Phenotype
Validation Studies
Cysts
Chronic Disease
Alcohols
Physicians
Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology
  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Clinical Profile, Etiology, and Treatment of Chronic Pancreatitis in North American Women : Analysis of a Large Multicenter Cohort. / Romagnuolo, Joseph; Talluri, Jyothsna; Kennard, Elizabeth; Sandhu, Bimaljit S.; Sherman, Stuart; Cote, Gregory A.; Al-Kaade, Samer; Gardner, Timothy B.; Gelrud, Andres; Lewis, Michele D.; Forsmark, Christopher E.; Guda, Nalini M.; Conwell, Darwin L.; Banks, Peter A.; Muniraj, Thiruvengadam; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Tian, Y.; Wilcox, C. M.; Anderson, Michelle A.; Brand, Randall E.; Slivka, Adam; Whitcomb, David; Yadav, Dhiraj.

In: Pancreas, 10.03.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Romagnuolo, J, Talluri, J, Kennard, E, Sandhu, BS, Sherman, S, Cote, GA, Al-Kaade, S, Gardner, TB, Gelrud, A, Lewis, MD, Forsmark, CE, Guda, NM, Conwell, DL, Banks, PA, Muniraj, T, Wisniewski, SR, Tian, Y, Wilcox, CM, Anderson, MA, Brand, RE, Slivka, A, Whitcomb, D & Yadav, D 2016, 'Clinical Profile, Etiology, and Treatment of Chronic Pancreatitis in North American Women: Analysis of a Large Multicenter Cohort', Pancreas. https://doi.org/10.1097/MPA.0000000000000616
Romagnuolo, Joseph ; Talluri, Jyothsna ; Kennard, Elizabeth ; Sandhu, Bimaljit S. ; Sherman, Stuart ; Cote, Gregory A. ; Al-Kaade, Samer ; Gardner, Timothy B. ; Gelrud, Andres ; Lewis, Michele D. ; Forsmark, Christopher E. ; Guda, Nalini M. ; Conwell, Darwin L. ; Banks, Peter A. ; Muniraj, Thiruvengadam ; Wisniewski, Stephen R. ; Tian, Y. ; Wilcox, C. M. ; Anderson, Michelle A. ; Brand, Randall E. ; Slivka, Adam ; Whitcomb, David ; Yadav, Dhiraj. / Clinical Profile, Etiology, and Treatment of Chronic Pancreatitis in North American Women : Analysis of a Large Multicenter Cohort. In: Pancreas. 2016.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Historically, chronic pancreatitis (CP) was considered a disease of alcoholic males, but recent data suggest its etiology to be complex. To better understand CP in women, we compared data on women and men with CP in a large, prospectively ascertained multicenter US cohort. METHODS: Patients with CP enrolled in the NAPS2 Continuation and Validation study were studied. Information on demographics, etiology, risk factors, phenotype, and treatment(s) used was obtained from detailed questionnaires completed by the patients and physicians. RESULTS: Of 521 cases, 45{\%} were women. Women were significantly (P <0.05) less likely to have alcohol etiology (30{\%} vs 58.5{\%}) and more likely to have nonalcoholic etiologies (idiopathic, 32{\%} vs 18{\%}; obstructive, 12{\%} vs 2.4{\%}; genetic, 12.8{\%} vs 7.3{\%}). Demographics, pain experience, morphologic findings, exocrine and endocrine insufficiency, CP-related disability, and use of medical therapies were mostly similar in both sexes. Sphincterotomy (biliary, 33{\%} vs 24{\%}; pancreatic, 38{\%} vs 28{\%}; P <0.05) was performed more frequently in women, whereas cyst/pseudocyst operations were more common in men (6.6 vs 2.6{\%}, P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Most CP cases in women are from nonalcoholic etiologies. In contrast to many other chronic diseases, clinical phenotype of CP is determined by the disease and is independent of sex.",
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T1 - Clinical Profile, Etiology, and Treatment of Chronic Pancreatitis in North American Women

T2 - Analysis of a Large Multicenter Cohort

AU - Romagnuolo, Joseph

AU - Talluri, Jyothsna

AU - Kennard, Elizabeth

AU - Sandhu, Bimaljit S.

AU - Sherman, Stuart

AU - Cote, Gregory A.

AU - Al-Kaade, Samer

AU - Gardner, Timothy B.

AU - Gelrud, Andres

AU - Lewis, Michele D.

AU - Forsmark, Christopher E.

AU - Guda, Nalini M.

AU - Conwell, Darwin L.

AU - Banks, Peter A.

AU - Muniraj, Thiruvengadam

AU - Wisniewski, Stephen R.

AU - Tian, Y.

AU - Wilcox, C. M.

AU - Anderson, Michelle A.

AU - Brand, Randall E.

AU - Slivka, Adam

AU - Whitcomb, David

AU - Yadav, Dhiraj

PY - 2016/3/10

Y1 - 2016/3/10

N2 - OBJECTIVE: Historically, chronic pancreatitis (CP) was considered a disease of alcoholic males, but recent data suggest its etiology to be complex. To better understand CP in women, we compared data on women and men with CP in a large, prospectively ascertained multicenter US cohort. METHODS: Patients with CP enrolled in the NAPS2 Continuation and Validation study were studied. Information on demographics, etiology, risk factors, phenotype, and treatment(s) used was obtained from detailed questionnaires completed by the patients and physicians. RESULTS: Of 521 cases, 45% were women. Women were significantly (P <0.05) less likely to have alcohol etiology (30% vs 58.5%) and more likely to have nonalcoholic etiologies (idiopathic, 32% vs 18%; obstructive, 12% vs 2.4%; genetic, 12.8% vs 7.3%). Demographics, pain experience, morphologic findings, exocrine and endocrine insufficiency, CP-related disability, and use of medical therapies were mostly similar in both sexes. Sphincterotomy (biliary, 33% vs 24%; pancreatic, 38% vs 28%; P <0.05) was performed more frequently in women, whereas cyst/pseudocyst operations were more common in men (6.6 vs 2.6%, P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Most CP cases in women are from nonalcoholic etiologies. In contrast to many other chronic diseases, clinical phenotype of CP is determined by the disease and is independent of sex.

AB - OBJECTIVE: Historically, chronic pancreatitis (CP) was considered a disease of alcoholic males, but recent data suggest its etiology to be complex. To better understand CP in women, we compared data on women and men with CP in a large, prospectively ascertained multicenter US cohort. METHODS: Patients with CP enrolled in the NAPS2 Continuation and Validation study were studied. Information on demographics, etiology, risk factors, phenotype, and treatment(s) used was obtained from detailed questionnaires completed by the patients and physicians. RESULTS: Of 521 cases, 45% were women. Women were significantly (P <0.05) less likely to have alcohol etiology (30% vs 58.5%) and more likely to have nonalcoholic etiologies (idiopathic, 32% vs 18%; obstructive, 12% vs 2.4%; genetic, 12.8% vs 7.3%). Demographics, pain experience, morphologic findings, exocrine and endocrine insufficiency, CP-related disability, and use of medical therapies were mostly similar in both sexes. Sphincterotomy (biliary, 33% vs 24%; pancreatic, 38% vs 28%; P <0.05) was performed more frequently in women, whereas cyst/pseudocyst operations were more common in men (6.6 vs 2.6%, P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Most CP cases in women are from nonalcoholic etiologies. In contrast to many other chronic diseases, clinical phenotype of CP is determined by the disease and is independent of sex.

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