Clonidine for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: I. Efficacy and tolerability outcomes

Donna R. Palumbo, Floyd R. Sallee, William E. Pelham, Oscar G. Bukstein, W. Burleson Daviss, Michael P. McDermott, Lisa Burrows-MacLean, Peter Como, Martin T. Hoffman, Thomas M. Lock, Daniel Nelson, Brian McConville, Joanne Janciuras, Stephen A. Bean, Dana Raab, Francis Arnold, Heidi Kipp, Nancy Pearson, Amy Vierhile, Brad RussellKaty Tresco, Michael Cannon, Susan Maher, David Marcus, Garrett Riggs, Adelaide Robb, Peter Harris, Irene Richard, Stephen Sulkes, Cox Christopher Cox, Roger Kurlan, Keith Conners, Robert Hunt, Karl Kieburtz, Elisabeth De Blieck, Patricia Lindsay, Larry Preston, Karen Rothenburgh, Elaine Julian-Baros, Connie Orme, Dee Kamp, Lisa Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

98 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy and safety of clonidine, used alone or in combination with methylphenidate, in treating attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). METHOD: A 16-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted in 122 children, ages 7 to 12, with any subtype of ADHD, randomly assigned to clonidine, methylphenidate, clonidine in combination with methylphenidate, or placebo according to a 2 × 2 factorial design. In two successive 4-week titration periods, clonidine (or matching placebo) and added methylphenidate (or matching placebo) were adjusted to optimal doses and then continued for 8 weeks. The primary efficacy outcome was changed from baseline to week 16 on the Conners Teachers Abbreviated Symptom Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes included the Conners Abbreviated Symptom Questionnaire for Parents and the Children's Global Assessment Scale. RESULTS: On the Conners Teachers Abbreviated Symptom Questionnaire, clonidine was not found to improve ADHD symptoms, whereas subjects treated with methylphenidate showed significant improvement compared to those not treated with methylphenidate. Subjects treated with clonidine had greater improvements on the Conners Abbreviated Symptom Questionnaire for Parents and Children's Global Assessment Scale, but also a higher rate of sedation compared with subjects not treated with clonidine. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the Conners Teachers Abbreviated Symptom Questionnaire, methylphenidate offers the best combination of efficacy and tolerability for ADHD. Clonidine was well tolerated despite the frequency of sedation and did offer some benefit. Copyright 2008

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)180-188
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume47
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2008

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Keywords

  • Attentiondeficit/hyperactivity disorder
  • Clinical trials
  • Clonidine
  • Methylphenidate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Palumbo, D. R., Sallee, F. R., Pelham, W. E., Bukstein, O. G., Daviss, W. B., McDermott, M. P., Burrows-MacLean, L., Como, P., Hoffman, M. T., Lock, T. M., Nelson, D., McConville, B., Janciuras, J., Bean, S. A., Raab, D., Arnold, F., Kipp, H., Pearson, N., Vierhile, A., ... Thompson, L. (2008). Clonidine for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: I. Efficacy and tolerability outcomes. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 47(2), 180-188. https://doi.org/10.1097/chi.0b013e31815d9af7