Clusters of impaired normal elderly do not decline cognitively in 3 to 5 years

James F. Malec

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ability of clusters of psychometric profiles to predict cognitive decline 3 to 5 years later was: examined. Using Ward's method, researchers conducted cluster analysis of age- and education-corrected Mayo Cognitive Factor Scale (MCFS) scores obtained at first evaluation for 376 normal elderly. Results revealed 4 of 16 cluster profiles were predicted to represent at-risk status for future cognitive decline; 258 of the original sample completed psychometric reassessment. Membership in an at-risk cluster did not powerfully predict subsequent medical evaluation of cognitive or psychiatric disorder or status as lost to follow-up. Repeated measures analyses of variance of MCFS scores showed no differential decline in learning or memory between normal and at-risk clusters. Thus, in a nonclinical sample, relative cognitive impairments are not powerfully predictive of future cognitive decline.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)66-73
Number of pages8
JournalNeuropsychology
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Psychometrics
Aptitude
Lost to Follow-Up
Cluster Analysis
Psychiatry
Analysis of Variance
Research Personnel
Learning
Education
Cognitive Dysfunction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Clusters of impaired normal elderly do not decline cognitively in 3 to 5 years. / Malec, James F.

In: Neuropsychology, Vol. 10, No. 1, 1996, p. 66-73.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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