Cochlear implantation in auditory neuropathy

Richard Miyamoto, Karen Iler Kirk, Julia Renshaw, Debra Hussain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

116 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Auditory neuropathy is a recently described clinical entity characterized by sensorineural hearing loss in which the auditory evoked potential (ABR) is absent but otoacoustic emissions are present. This suggests a central locus for the associated hearing loss. In this study the results observed in a child with auditory neuropathy who received a cochlear implant are presented and compared with those of a matched group of children who were recipients of implants. Methods: A single-subject, repeated-measures design, evaluating closed-set and open-set word recognition abilities was used to assess the subject and a control group of matched children with implants who had also experienced a progressive sensorineural hearing loss. Results: The subject demonstrated improvements in vowel recognition (82% correct) by 1 year after implantation, which were only slightly lower than the control group. Consonant recognition and open-set word recognition scores were significantly lower. Conclusion: Caution should be exercised when considering cochlear implantation in children with auditory neuropathy. As with conventional hearing aids, less than optimal results may be seen.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)181-185
Number of pages5
JournalLaryngoscope
Volume109
Issue number2 I
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1999

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Cochlear Implantation
Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Auditory Evoked Potentials
Control Groups
Hearing Aids
Cochlear Implants
Hearing Loss
Research Design
Auditory neuropathy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Cochlear implantation in auditory neuropathy. / Miyamoto, Richard; Kirk, Karen Iler; Renshaw, Julia; Hussain, Debra.

In: Laryngoscope, Vol. 109, No. 2 I, 02.1999, p. 181-185.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Miyamoto, R, Kirk, KI, Renshaw, J & Hussain, D 1999, 'Cochlear implantation in auditory neuropathy', Laryngoscope, vol. 109, no. 2 I, pp. 181-185. https://doi.org/10.1097/00005537-199902000-00002
Miyamoto, Richard ; Kirk, Karen Iler ; Renshaw, Julia ; Hussain, Debra. / Cochlear implantation in auditory neuropathy. In: Laryngoscope. 1999 ; Vol. 109, No. 2 I. pp. 181-185.
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