Codesigned shared decision-making diabetes management plan tool for adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus and their parents: Prototype development and pilot test

Tamara Hannon, Courtney M. Moore, Erika R. Cheng, Dustin O. Lynch, Lisa G. Yazel-Smith, Gina E.M. Claxton, Aaron Carroll, Sarah Wiehe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus have difficulty achieving optimal glycemic control, partly due to competing priorities that interfere with diabetes self-care. Often, significant diabetes-related family conflict occurs, and adolescents' thoughts and feelings about diabetes management may be disregarded. Patient-centered diabetes outcomes may be better when adolescents feel engaged in the decision-making process. Objective: The objective of our study was to codesign a clinic intervention using shared decision making for addressing diabetes self-care with an adolescent patient and parent advisory board. Methods: The patient and parent advisory board consisted of 6 adolescents (teens) between the ages 12 and 18 years with type 1 diabetes mellitus and their parents recruited through our institution's Pediatric Diabetes Program. Teens and parents provided informed consent and participated in 1 or both of 2 patient and parent advisory board sessions, lasting 3 to 4 hours each. Session 1 topics were (1) patient-centered outcomes related to quality of life, parent-teen shared diabetes management, and shared family experiences; and (2) implementation and acceptability of a patient-centered diabetes care plan intervention where shared decision making was used. We analyzed audio recordings, notes, and other materials to identify and extract ideas relevant to the development of a patient-centered diabetes management plan. These data were visually coded into similar themes. We used the information to develop a prototype for a diabetes management plan tool that we pilot tested during session 2. Results: Session 1 identified 6 principal patient-centered quality-of-life measurement domains: stress, fear and worry, mealtime struggles, assumptions and judgments, feeling abnormal, and conflict. We determined 2 objectives to be principally important for a diabetes management plan intervention: (1) focusing the intervention on diabetes distress and conflict resolution strategies, and (2) working toward a verbalized common goal. In session 2, we created the diabetes management plan tool according to these findings and will use it in a clinical trial with the aim of assisting with patient-centered goal setting. Conclusions: Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus can be effectively engaged and involved in patient-centered research design. Teens with type 1 diabetes mellitus prioritize reducing family conflict and fitting into their social milieu over health outcomes at this time in their lives. It is important to acknowledge this when designing interventions to improve health outcomes in teens with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere8
JournalJournal of Medical Internet Research
Volume20
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

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Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Decision Making
Parents
Family Conflict
Self Care
Emotions
Quality of Life
Patient-Centered Care
Negotiating
Health
Informed Consent
Fear
Meals
Research Design
Clinical Trials
Pediatrics

Keywords

  • Adolescent health services
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Patient-centered care
  • Research design
  • Self-management
  • Type 1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics

Cite this

Codesigned shared decision-making diabetes management plan tool for adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus and their parents : Prototype development and pilot test. / Hannon, Tamara; Moore, Courtney M.; Cheng, Erika R.; Lynch, Dustin O.; Yazel-Smith, Lisa G.; Claxton, Gina E.M.; Carroll, Aaron; Wiehe, Sarah.

In: Journal of Medical Internet Research, Vol. 20, No. 5, e8, 01.05.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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