Cognition and illness experience are associated with illness knowledge among older adults with hypertension

Jessie Chin, Laura D'Andrea, Dan Morrow, Elizabeth A L Stine-Morrow, Thembi Conner-Garcia, James Graumlich, Michael Murray

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated how cognitive abilities and illness experience relate to illness knowledge. One hundred and forty-eight community-dwelling older adults including hypertensive patients and healthy adults completed a battery that measured illness knowledge, fluid cognitive abilities, crystallized abilities, and health history. Results suggested that hypertension knowledge was primarily associated with illness duration (despite a negative relationship between illness duration and fluid ability) and crystallized ability. Also, greater illness knowledge was associated with an illness perception that may be more consistent with self-care (e.g., greater sense of control). Implications for patient education and training are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Pages116-120
Number of pages5
Volume1
StatePublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes
Event53rd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2009, HFES 2009 - San Antonio, TX, United States
Duration: Oct 19 2009Oct 23 2009

Other

Other53rd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2009, HFES 2009
CountryUnited States
CitySan Antonio, TX
Period10/19/0910/23/09

Fingerprint

hypertension
cognition
illness
Fluids
experience
Education
Health
cognitive ability
ability
history
health
community
education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Chin, J., D'Andrea, L., Morrow, D., Stine-Morrow, E. A. L., Conner-Garcia, T., Graumlich, J., & Murray, M. (2009). Cognition and illness experience are associated with illness knowledge among older adults with hypertension. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (Vol. 1, pp. 116-120)

Cognition and illness experience are associated with illness knowledge among older adults with hypertension. / Chin, Jessie; D'Andrea, Laura; Morrow, Dan; Stine-Morrow, Elizabeth A L; Conner-Garcia, Thembi; Graumlich, James; Murray, Michael.

Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Vol. 1 2009. p. 116-120.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Chin, J, D'Andrea, L, Morrow, D, Stine-Morrow, EAL, Conner-Garcia, T, Graumlich, J & Murray, M 2009, Cognition and illness experience are associated with illness knowledge among older adults with hypertension. in Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. vol. 1, pp. 116-120, 53rd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2009, HFES 2009, San Antonio, TX, United States, 10/19/09.
Chin J, D'Andrea L, Morrow D, Stine-Morrow EAL, Conner-Garcia T, Graumlich J et al. Cognition and illness experience are associated with illness knowledge among older adults with hypertension. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Vol. 1. 2009. p. 116-120
Chin, Jessie ; D'Andrea, Laura ; Morrow, Dan ; Stine-Morrow, Elizabeth A L ; Conner-Garcia, Thembi ; Graumlich, James ; Murray, Michael. / Cognition and illness experience are associated with illness knowledge among older adults with hypertension. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Vol. 1 2009. pp. 116-120
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