Cognitive deficits in Heart failure: Re-cognition of vulnerability as a strange new world

Rebecca S. Sloan, Susan Pressler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND:: Patients with chronic heart failure (HF) have impairment in memory, psychomotor speed, and executive function. OBJECTIVE:: The aim of this study was to describe how individuals with HF and cognitive deficits manage self-care in their daily lives. METHODS:: Using an interpretive phenomenology method, HF patients completed unstructured face-to-face interviews about their ability to manage complex health regimens and maintain their health-related quality of life. Analysis of data was aided by use of Atlas.ti computer software. RESULTS:: The sample consisted of 12 patients (10 men; aged 43-81 years) who had previously undergone neuropsychological testing and were found to have deficits in 3 or more cognitive domains. Patients confirmed that they followed the advice of healthcare providers by adherence to medication regimens, dietary sodium restrictions, and HF self-care. One overarching theme was identified: "Re-cognition of Vulnerability: A Strange New World." This theme was further differentiated into 3 components: (1) not recognizing cognitive deficits; (2) recognizing cognitive deficits, described as (a) never could remember anything, (b) just old age, (c) HF-related change, and (d) making normal accommodations; and (3) re-cognizing vulnerability, explained by perception of (a) cognitive, (b) physical, and (c) social vulnerabilities, as well as perception of (d) the nearness of death. DISCUSSION:: Although the study was designed to focus on the cognitive changes in HF patients, it was difficult to separate cognitive, physical, and social challenges. These changes are most useful when taken as a constellation. Healthcare professionals can use the knowledge to identify problems and interventions for HF patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)241-248
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Cardiovascular Nursing
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cognition
Heart Failure
Self Care
Dietary Sodium
Aptitude
Medication Adherence
Atlases
Executive Function
Health Personnel
Software
Quality of Life
Interviews
Delivery of Health Care
Health

Keywords

  • Chronic heart failure
  • Cognitive deficits
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Heart failure
  • Self-care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Cognitive deficits in Heart failure : Re-cognition of vulnerability as a strange new world. / Sloan, Rebecca S.; Pressler, Susan.

In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, Vol. 24, No. 3, 05.2009, p. 241-248.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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