Cognitive testing in older primary care patients: A cluster-randomized trial

Nicole Fowler, Lisa Morrow, Laurel Chiappetta, Beth Snitz, Kimberly Huber, Eric Rodriguez, Judith Saxton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: This study investigated whether neuropsychological testing in primary care (PC) offices altered physician-initiated interventions related to cognitive impairment (CI) or slowed the rate of CI progression. Methods: This 24-month, cluster-randomized study included 11 community-based PC practices randomized to either treatment as usual (5 practices) or cognitive report (CR; 6 practices) arms. From 2005 to 2008, 533 patients aged ≥65 years and without a diagnosis of CI were recruited; 423 were retested 24 months after baseline. Results: CR physicians were significantly more likely to order cognitive-related interventions (P =02), document discussions about cognition (P =003), and order blood tests to rule out reversible CI (P = 002). At follow-up, significantly more CR patients had a medication for cognition listed in their chart (P = 02). There was no difference in the rate of cognitive decline between the groups. Discussion: Providing cognitive information to physicians resulted in higher rates of physician-initiated interventions for patients with CI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)349-357
Number of pages9
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment and Disease Monitoring
Volume1
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

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Primary Health Care
Physicians
Cognition
Physicians' Offices
Hematologic Tests
Cognitive Dysfunction
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Age
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Cognitive impairment
  • Community-based
  • Dementia
  • Mild cognitive impairment primary care
  • Primary care physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Cognitive testing in older primary care patients : A cluster-randomized trial. / Fowler, Nicole; Morrow, Lisa; Chiappetta, Laurel; Snitz, Beth; Huber, Kimberly; Rodriguez, Eric; Saxton, Judith.

In: Alzheimer's and Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment and Disease Monitoring, Vol. 1, No. 3, 01.09.2015, p. 349-357.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fowler, Nicole ; Morrow, Lisa ; Chiappetta, Laurel ; Snitz, Beth ; Huber, Kimberly ; Rodriguez, Eric ; Saxton, Judith. / Cognitive testing in older primary care patients : A cluster-randomized trial. In: Alzheimer's and Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment and Disease Monitoring. 2015 ; Vol. 1, No. 3. pp. 349-357.
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