College Students' Knowledge Concerning Oropharyngeal Cancer, Human Papillomavirus, and Intent Toward Being Examined

Kimberly Walker, Richard Jackson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess college students' knowledge of oral/oropharyngeal cancer and the relationship of human papillomavirus (HPV) to oropharyngeal cancer. Data were also collected to determine their perceived susceptibility to oropharyngeal cancer and awareness of emotions toward and intentions to receive an oral cancer examination in order to design tailored messages for promoting oropharyngeal cancer prevention on college campuses. Two hundred ten baccalaureate students in nonhealth majors from a public southeastern university were surveyed. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and multiple regression analysis was conducted to determine the predictors of knowledge of oral/oropharyngeal cancer and the HPV and intentions to be examined. Results indicated most were unaware of oropharyngeal cancer, did not understand the purpose of an oral cancer examination, and could not affirm they had received one or had one explained to them. Results also indicated poor understanding of some of the signs and risk factors of oropharyngeal cancer, especially HPV. In addition, oral/oropharyngeal cancer knowledge and negative emotions were predictors of examination intentions, confirming current behavioral theories that postulate rational decisions require collaboration from both cognitive and affective systems. Recommendations are offered for tailored educational communications and strategies about oropharyngeal cancer on college campuses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)250-261
Number of pages12
JournalHealth Care Manager
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Oropharyngeal Neoplasms
cancer
Students
Mouth Neoplasms
student
Oral Diagnosis
Emotions
examination
emotion
descriptive statistics
Communication
Regression Analysis
regression analysis
communications

Keywords

  • health survey
  • human papillomavirus
  • oropharyngeal neoplasms
  • students

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Leadership and Management
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Policy
  • Care Planning

Cite this

College Students' Knowledge Concerning Oropharyngeal Cancer, Human Papillomavirus, and Intent Toward Being Examined. / Walker, Kimberly; Jackson, Richard.

In: Health Care Manager, Vol. 37, No. 3, 01.07.2018, p. 250-261.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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