Color coding of digitized echocardiograms

description of a new technique and application in detecting and correcting for cardiac translation.

J. R. Bates, T. Ryan, C. M. Rimmerman, D. S. Segar, Stephen Sawada, G. Fitch, Harvey Feigenbaum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Color coding is a new software application for digitized echocardiograms that displays a reference image of end diastole throughout the cardiac cycle. With color-coded digitized echocardiograms, we determined the frequency of, and corrected for cardiac translation in 21 bicycle stress echocardiograms in patients who were known to be without significant coronary artery disease or wall motion abnormalities. Translation was present in 4%, 40%, and 74% of rest, postexercise, and peak exercise images, respectively, and was noted most frequently in the apical views, 59% of four-chamber views and 40% of two-chamber views. Interobserver and intraobserver agreement for detection of translation was 81% and 86%, respectively. Translation was corrected by shifting digitized images to eliminate transverse displacement of the mitral valve anulus and restore normal basal-to-apical shortening. Ventricular contraction was assessed as normal in 92% of the images in which correction for translation was performed. In the remaining images, poor image quality (3%) and apparent wall motion abnormalities (5%) prevented the studies from being graded as normal. We conclude that color coding of digitized echocardiograms is a useful new technique that can be applied to detect and correct for cardiac translation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)363-369
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Society of Echocardiography
Volume7
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jul 1994

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Color
Diastole
Mitral Valve
Coronary Artery Disease
Software
Exercise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Color coding of digitized echocardiograms : description of a new technique and application in detecting and correcting for cardiac translation. / Bates, J. R.; Ryan, T.; Rimmerman, C. M.; Segar, D. S.; Sawada, Stephen; Fitch, G.; Feigenbaum, Harvey.

In: Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography, Vol. 7, No. 4, 07.1994, p. 363-369.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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