Commentary: Immunohistochemistry represents a useful tool to study human cell engraftment in SCID mice transplantation models

A. Orazi, S. E. Braun, H. E. Broxmeyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Human cord blood cells have been shown to highly engraft the marrows of sublethally irradiated SCID mice. Herein we report our experience with this system and the use of immunohistochemistry to identify human cell engraftment. Immunohistochemistry results correlated well with those of flow cytometry, human progenitor-cell cultures, and molecular analysis of human specific markers. Immunohistochemistry should play a useful role in the in vivo analysis of human stem/progenitor cell engraftment in xenogeneic transplantation models.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)323-330
Number of pages8
JournalBlood Cells
Volume20
Issue number2-3
StatePublished - 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

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