Commonalities and differences in correlates of depressive symptoms in men and women with heart failure

Jo Ann Eastwood, Debra K. Moser, Barbara J. Riegel, Nancy M. Albert, Susan Pressler, Misook L. Chung, Sandra Dunbar, Jia Rong Wu, Terry A. Lennie

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: (i) To compare the prevalence and severity of depressive symptoms between men and women enrolled in a large heart failure (HF) registry. (ii) To determine gender differences in predictors of depressive symptoms from demographic, behavioral, clinical, and psychosocial factors in HF patients. Methods: In 622 HF patients (70% male, 61 ± 13 years, 59% NYHA class III/IV), depressive symptoms were assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Potential correlates were age, ethnicity, education, marital and financial status, smoking, exercise, body mass index (BMI), HF etiology, NYHA class, comorbidities, functional capacity, anxiety, and perceived control. To identify gender-specific correlates of depressive symptoms, separate logistic regression models were built by gender. Results: Correlates of depressive symptoms in men were financial status (p = 0.027), NYHA (p = 0.001); functional capacity (p < 0.001); health perception (p = 0.043); perceived control (p = 0.002) and anxiety (p < 0.001). Correlates of depressive symptoms in women were BMI (p = 0.003); perceived control (p = 0.013) and anxiety (p < 0.001). Conclusions: In HF patients, lowering depressive symptoms may require gender-specific interventions focusing on weight management in women and improving perceived functional capacity in men. Both men and women with HF may benefit from anxiety reduction and increased control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)356-365
Number of pages10
JournalEuropean Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Heart Failure
Depression
Anxiety
Body Mass Index
Logistic Models
Health
Marital Status
Registries
Comorbidity
Smoking
Demography
Exercise
Psychology
Education
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Gender
  • Heart failure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing
  • Medical–Surgical
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Commonalities and differences in correlates of depressive symptoms in men and women with heart failure. / Eastwood, Jo Ann; Moser, Debra K.; Riegel, Barbara J.; Albert, Nancy M.; Pressler, Susan; Chung, Misook L.; Dunbar, Sandra; Wu, Jia Rong; Lennie, Terry A.

In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, Vol. 11, No. 3, 09.2012, p. 356-365.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Eastwood, JA, Moser, DK, Riegel, BJ, Albert, NM, Pressler, S, Chung, ML, Dunbar, S, Wu, JR & Lennie, TA 2012, 'Commonalities and differences in correlates of depressive symptoms in men and women with heart failure', European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 356-365. https://doi.org/10.1177/1474515112438010
Eastwood, Jo Ann ; Moser, Debra K. ; Riegel, Barbara J. ; Albert, Nancy M. ; Pressler, Susan ; Chung, Misook L. ; Dunbar, Sandra ; Wu, Jia Rong ; Lennie, Terry A. / Commonalities and differences in correlates of depressive symptoms in men and women with heart failure. In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing. 2012 ; Vol. 11, No. 3. pp. 356-365.
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