Communication during pediatric asthma visits and child asthma medication device technique 1 month later

Betsy Sleath, Delesha M. Carpenter, Guadalupe X. Ayala, Dennis Williams, Stephanie Davis, Gail Tudor, Karin Yeatts, Chris Gillette

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. This study investigated how provider demonstration of and assessment of child use of asthma medication devices and certain aspects of providerpatient communication during medical visits is associated with device technique 1 month later. Methods. Two hundred and ninety-six children aged 816 years with persistent asthma and their caregivers were recruited at five North Carolina pediatric practices. All of the medical visits were audio-tape recorded. Children were interviewed 1 month later and their device technique was observed and rated. Results. If the provider asked the child to demonstrate metered dose inhaler technique during the medical visit, then the child was significantly more likely to perform a greater percentage of inhaler steps correctly 1 month later. Children with higher asthma management self-efficacy scores were significantly more likely to perform a greater percentage of diskus steps correctly. Additionally, children were significantly more likely to perform a greater percentage of diskus steps correctly if the provider discussed a written action plan during the visit. Children were significantly more likely to perform a greater percentage of turbuhaler steps correctly if they asked more medication questions. Conclusions. Providers should ask children to demonstrate their inhaler technique during medical visits so that they can educate children about proper technique and improve child asthma management self-efficacy. Providers should encourage children to ask questions about asthma medication devices during visits and they should discuss asthma action plans with families.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)918-925
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Asthma
Volume49
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Asthma
Communication
Pediatrics
Equipment and Supplies
Nebulizers and Vaporizers
Self Efficacy
Metered Dose Inhalers
Caregivers

Keywords

  • Device technique
  • Medication questions
  • Self-efficacy
  • Written action plans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Communication during pediatric asthma visits and child asthma medication device technique 1 month later. / Sleath, Betsy; Carpenter, Delesha M.; Ayala, Guadalupe X.; Williams, Dennis; Davis, Stephanie; Tudor, Gail; Yeatts, Karin; Gillette, Chris.

In: Journal of Asthma, Vol. 49, No. 9, 11.2012, p. 918-925.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sleath, B, Carpenter, DM, Ayala, GX, Williams, D, Davis, S, Tudor, G, Yeatts, K & Gillette, C 2012, 'Communication during pediatric asthma visits and child asthma medication device technique 1 month later', Journal of Asthma, vol. 49, no. 9, pp. 918-925. https://doi.org/10.3109/02770903.2012.719250
Sleath, Betsy ; Carpenter, Delesha M. ; Ayala, Guadalupe X. ; Williams, Dennis ; Davis, Stephanie ; Tudor, Gail ; Yeatts, Karin ; Gillette, Chris. / Communication during pediatric asthma visits and child asthma medication device technique 1 month later. In: Journal of Asthma. 2012 ; Vol. 49, No. 9. pp. 918-925.
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