Community partners as co-teachers in resident continuity clinics

Lynne A. Sturm, Janet Shultz, Rebecca Kirby, Sarah M. Stelzner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Standard approaches to teaching the management of psychosocial issues in pediatrics-visits to community-based organizations and stand-alone block rotations in developmental-behavioral pediatrics and community pediatrics-neither expose residents to models of interdisciplinary collaboration between faculty preceptors and community providers nor take advantage of the efficacy of learning in continuity clinics. The authors describe their project, developed from an existing Community Pediatrics Training Initiative with long-standing relationships with a domestic violence shelter, a community center for Latino families, and a special needs resource organization for parents. They lay out in detail the project's innovative use of partners from community-based organizations, colocated within pediatric continuity clinics, who teach both residents and faculty about community resources and linkages with multidisciplinary providers. The authors present lessons learned by faculty preceptors, residents, the community partners, and project staff that can guide future applications of this model in other residency training programs. Faculty and residents indicated an increased awareness of available community resources and how linkages can be incorporated into pediatric outpatient visits. Community partners identified keys to successful co-teaching, including readiness to adopt an assertive communication style and frequent presence in the clinics. Project staff recognized the challenges of staff turnover at community-based organizations and the need to choose community partners with expertise that fits the sociodemographic issues of the clinic's patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1532-1538
Number of pages7
JournalAcademic Medicine
Volume86
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2011

Fingerprint

continuity
resident
teacher
community
Pediatrics
Organizations
staff
Teaching
resources
community center
Domestic Violence
turnover
domestic violence
Internship and Residency
Hispanic Americans
training program
parents
expertise
Outpatients
Parents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Community partners as co-teachers in resident continuity clinics. / Sturm, Lynne A.; Shultz, Janet; Kirby, Rebecca; Stelzner, Sarah M.

In: Academic Medicine, Vol. 86, No. 12, 12.2011, p. 1532-1538.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sturm, Lynne A. ; Shultz, Janet ; Kirby, Rebecca ; Stelzner, Sarah M. / Community partners as co-teachers in resident continuity clinics. In: Academic Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 86, No. 12. pp. 1532-1538.
@article{15f8b0bf24504abdb47ad3306f9f4f57,
title = "Community partners as co-teachers in resident continuity clinics",
abstract = "Standard approaches to teaching the management of psychosocial issues in pediatrics-visits to community-based organizations and stand-alone block rotations in developmental-behavioral pediatrics and community pediatrics-neither expose residents to models of interdisciplinary collaboration between faculty preceptors and community providers nor take advantage of the efficacy of learning in continuity clinics. The authors describe their project, developed from an existing Community Pediatrics Training Initiative with long-standing relationships with a domestic violence shelter, a community center for Latino families, and a special needs resource organization for parents. They lay out in detail the project's innovative use of partners from community-based organizations, colocated within pediatric continuity clinics, who teach both residents and faculty about community resources and linkages with multidisciplinary providers. The authors present lessons learned by faculty preceptors, residents, the community partners, and project staff that can guide future applications of this model in other residency training programs. Faculty and residents indicated an increased awareness of available community resources and how linkages can be incorporated into pediatric outpatient visits. Community partners identified keys to successful co-teaching, including readiness to adopt an assertive communication style and frequent presence in the clinics. Project staff recognized the challenges of staff turnover at community-based organizations and the need to choose community partners with expertise that fits the sociodemographic issues of the clinic's patients.",
author = "Sturm, {Lynne A.} and Janet Shultz and Rebecca Kirby and Stelzner, {Sarah M.}",
year = "2011",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1097/ACM.0b013e3182359764",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "86",
pages = "1532--1538",
journal = "Academic Medicine",
issn = "1040-2446",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Community partners as co-teachers in resident continuity clinics

AU - Sturm, Lynne A.

AU - Shultz, Janet

AU - Kirby, Rebecca

AU - Stelzner, Sarah M.

PY - 2011/12

Y1 - 2011/12

N2 - Standard approaches to teaching the management of psychosocial issues in pediatrics-visits to community-based organizations and stand-alone block rotations in developmental-behavioral pediatrics and community pediatrics-neither expose residents to models of interdisciplinary collaboration between faculty preceptors and community providers nor take advantage of the efficacy of learning in continuity clinics. The authors describe their project, developed from an existing Community Pediatrics Training Initiative with long-standing relationships with a domestic violence shelter, a community center for Latino families, and a special needs resource organization for parents. They lay out in detail the project's innovative use of partners from community-based organizations, colocated within pediatric continuity clinics, who teach both residents and faculty about community resources and linkages with multidisciplinary providers. The authors present lessons learned by faculty preceptors, residents, the community partners, and project staff that can guide future applications of this model in other residency training programs. Faculty and residents indicated an increased awareness of available community resources and how linkages can be incorporated into pediatric outpatient visits. Community partners identified keys to successful co-teaching, including readiness to adopt an assertive communication style and frequent presence in the clinics. Project staff recognized the challenges of staff turnover at community-based organizations and the need to choose community partners with expertise that fits the sociodemographic issues of the clinic's patients.

AB - Standard approaches to teaching the management of psychosocial issues in pediatrics-visits to community-based organizations and stand-alone block rotations in developmental-behavioral pediatrics and community pediatrics-neither expose residents to models of interdisciplinary collaboration between faculty preceptors and community providers nor take advantage of the efficacy of learning in continuity clinics. The authors describe their project, developed from an existing Community Pediatrics Training Initiative with long-standing relationships with a domestic violence shelter, a community center for Latino families, and a special needs resource organization for parents. They lay out in detail the project's innovative use of partners from community-based organizations, colocated within pediatric continuity clinics, who teach both residents and faculty about community resources and linkages with multidisciplinary providers. The authors present lessons learned by faculty preceptors, residents, the community partners, and project staff that can guide future applications of this model in other residency training programs. Faculty and residents indicated an increased awareness of available community resources and how linkages can be incorporated into pediatric outpatient visits. Community partners identified keys to successful co-teaching, including readiness to adopt an assertive communication style and frequent presence in the clinics. Project staff recognized the challenges of staff turnover at community-based organizations and the need to choose community partners with expertise that fits the sociodemographic issues of the clinic's patients.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=82655178035&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=82655178035&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/ACM.0b013e3182359764

DO - 10.1097/ACM.0b013e3182359764

M3 - Article

C2 - 22030765

AN - SCOPUS:82655178035

VL - 86

SP - 1532

EP - 1538

JO - Academic Medicine

JF - Academic Medicine

SN - 1040-2446

IS - 12

ER -